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A history of New Zealand product design with Michael Smythe

Join Michael Smythe for an in-depth series of talks, spread over four Sundays in November and December, surveying Aotearoa’s design histories. The series will look at how locally made and marketed products have reflected and negotiated national identity through shifting relationships with the British Empire and the wider Moana Oceania region.

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White Night: Basant Madhur and the Sargam School of Music

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Project Banaba The untold mining history of Banaba Ocean Island

Project Banaba by Banaban scholar and artist Katerina Teaiwa (Tabiang and Tabwewa) is a traveling multimedia installation that commemorates the history of Banaba, also known as Ocean Island in the Moana Pacific.

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Cora-Allan Wickliffe: From Otītori Bay Rd

This exhibition presents a series of landscape paintings made by Cora-Allan Wickliffe during her residency at Parehuia, which sits at number 67 Otītori Bay Road – a short but steep descent from Te Uru, toward the waters of the Manukau Harbour. Using paints harvested and processed from the local Waitākere whenua, the images are intimate studies of the land and a living archive of it, as well as visual journals of the artist’s stay.

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Te Kaneati

Te Kaneati is a presentation of Banaban arts, culture and heritage by Tāmaki Makaurau’s Banaban community, presented alongside the exhibition Project Banaba by artist Katerina Teaiwa (Tabiang and Tabwewa) highlighting the resilience of the diaspora.

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Notes For Tomorrow

Notes for tomorrow is an exhibition conceived by Independent Curators International (ICI), featuring artworks selected by curators from around the world to reflect on a new global reality ushered in by the Covid-19 pandemic. In this cultural moment of transition, each work is a source of inspiration from the recent past and a guiding perspective for the future.

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Benjamin Work And Brendan Kitto: Motutapu

MOTUTAPU is the conclusion of a four-year journey by artist Benjamin Work and photographer Brendan Kitto. This exhibition looks at the shared history of Motutapu (sacred island) throughout Moana Oceania as places of santuary, reconnection and reconciliation.

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Film screening: Shezad Dawood's Leviathan Episodes 1-6

Leviathan is a proposal to envision a future that is very much like our present, where the boundaries of the social, political, and scientific are genuinely challenged. Historically, Leviathan is the primordial sea serpent depicted in Jewish mythology, brought to collective consciousness by Thomas Hobbes’ treatise on human nature.

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Film Screening: Signed, Theo Schoon

Tracing the story of one of our more complex characters, this layered portrait re-examines the exploits of influential outsider, Dutch immigrant artist Theo Schoon, told in his own words and through first-hand accounts.

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Film screening: Neil Feather: Sound mechanic

Te Uru and The Audio Foundation present: Sound mechanic (NZ PREMIERE)

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Wanda Gillespie: Counting frames for a transient era

Wanda Gillespie is an Auckland-based artist working with wood to create bespoke abaci. Her contemporary interpretations of this ancient counting instrument explore and expand upon the creation of value, systems of measurement, and encounters between material and mystical worlds.

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Otherwise-image-worlds

Otherwise-image-worlds brings together five newly commissioned artworks from artists working in animation. Working against the commercial demand for spectacle and efficiency, Danielle Brathwaite-Shirley, Juliet Carpenter, Tanu Gago, Ary Jansen and Sorawit Songsataya, all expand and reconfigure the conventions of image-making, asking what modes of interaction, imagination, attention, and refusal animation can cultivate.

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Robert Rapson: Against the tide

This exhibition celebrates the life and work of the late, self-taught ceramic artist, Robert Rapson, best known for his wonderfully wonky yet uncannily accurate sculptures of boats. Against The Tide reflects both Rapson’s passion for ships and his position outside the artistic status quo, and his clever and quirky way of looking at the world.

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Emily Karaka: Matariki Ring of Fire

Matariki Ring of Fire follows Emily Karaka’s 2021 McCahon House residency. The exhibition centres on the festival of Matariki, which is being marked by a public holiday for the first time in 2022, the Matariki star cluster, and the fourteen Tūpuna Maunga of the Tāmaki Makaurau region.

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Toi Taiao Whakatairanga workshop with Charlotte Graham

Join artist Charlotte Graham for a free print workshop responding to the impact of myrtle rust. Participants will work in groups to compose a poem and then produce a print to take home using the artist's own print blocks. Learn about contemporary and local environmental issues, all while exploring the magical processes of printing!

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Shannon Te Ao: Ka mua, ka muri

Ka mua, ka muri explores experiences of time, history and song. Showing for the first time in Aotearoa, the exhibition was originally co-commissioned by two major Canadian galleries, Oakville Galleries, Toronto and Remai Modern, Saskatoon, with the support of Creative New Zealand. For this homecoming exhibition, Te Ao has added new works from his recent 2020 exhibition Mā te wā, as well as a new text work in collaboration with Kurt Komene (Te Ātiawa, Taranaki Whānui).

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Anna Crichton: Wayward works

Anna Crichton: Wayward works Te Uru presents Wayward works, an exciting selection of originals and work in print by local illustrator Anna Crichton. Over many years, award-winning satirical illustrator Anna Crichton has enhanced both New Zealand and overseas publications with her sharply drawn cartoons, caricatures and illustrations.

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Ana Iti: How should we talk to one another?

Recent McCahon House Resident Ana Iti (Te Rarawa) presents a new exhibition of work created during her time at the McCahon House studio between July and September 2020. The exhibition will look at the writing of Māori woman authors, and the journey of language learning.

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Steve Carr and Christian Lamont: Fading to the sky

Recent McCahon House Resident Steve Carr has collaborated with emerging artist Christian Lamont to present a new exhibition at Te Uru. A series of works from each artist will be presented in the gallery, overlapping and abstractly communing around themes of light, atmosphere and grief.

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The thrum of the tide

The thrum of the tide is a project by artists Jenny Gillam and Eugene Hansen (Maniapoto) that delves into the 20th century story of Te Ana Ru cave, known as ‘the ballroom cave’. The exhibition features taonga pūoro by Riki Bennett. Presented in association with the Auckland Arts Festival.

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Maori moving image ki Te Uru

Te Uru is delighted to present the latest iteration of Māori Moving Image. Examining photographs, texts and oral histories, the exhibition will portray the resilience and continuation of mātauranga Māori through a selection of moving image works by artists whose practices examine ‘the archive’.

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Mercury in retrograde

Mercury in retrograde: clay, earth, mud and ceramics brings together four artists working dynamically with the grounding materials of the earth. Artists Iza Lozano, Zhu Ohmu, Maia McDonald, and Te Ara Minhinnick present works that embrace, innovate and invert the practice of ceramics, challenging traditional notions and broadening our understanding of clay as an ever-contemporary material.

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Lisa Walker: She wants to go to her bedroom but she can't be bothered

An ambitious retrospective exhibition looking at Lisa Walker’s 30-year career as a pioneer of contemporary jewellery. Previously shown at CODA Museum in Apeldoorn, The Netherlands (2020); Museum Villa Stuck in Munich, Germany (2019), RMIT Design Hub Melbourne (2019), and Te Papa in Wellington (2018), Te Uru is delighted to present this major exhibition across two floors, accommodating over 250 pieces – a homecoming for these works that have travelled across the world.

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Star waka

Star Waka acknowledges past, present and future voyaging to and from Aotearoa in all directions, with the stars reflecting navigation patterns over time and space. Together, the waka and the stars symbolise the universe and the binding together of ira atua (the realm of the gods) and ira tangata (the realm of humans). Star Waka is also the title of Robert Sullivan’s book of poetry, which engages with the imagination and encapsulates our vision to create a symbolic waka in a star-studded universe.

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HANDSHAKE 5: in site

After four previous iterations, HANDSHAKE 5 gathers artists from each past HANDSHAKE project for a showcase that is independent of mentors; no longer emerging, these are now established artists. With materials spanning wood, metal, found object, video projection and virtual reality, HANDSHAKE 5: in site presents the culmination of almost ten years of learning through the HANDSHAKE programme, which has provided a platform for individual growth and a broader experience of cultural and artistic exchange.

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Bruce Barber and Mark Harvey: Button Action

Artists Bruce Barber and Mark Harvey revisit their performance collaboration, My Left is Your Right, performed earlier this year as part of the Free Hand performance series at Anna Leonowens Gallery in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

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What the Whau?

In Te Uru's Small Space this summer, What the Whau? is a collaborative exhibition featuring work by the partners and resident jewellers of Whau Studios in Pt Chevalier. Ranging from fine jewellery to fashion to contemporary jewellery, these works represent the diversity in inspiration and approach found between the four walls of this jewellery collective’s shared studio space.

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Kushana Bush: The Burning Hours

The Burning Hours focuses on works made between 2014-2016, showing audiences what happens when Bush pushes her compositional limits and uses the entire surface of the paper. This recent body of work is rich with detail – each surface, of gouache and gold, is filled with references to illuminated manuscripts, Persian miniatures, European art history and modern life.

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Marti Friedlander: Portraits of the Artists

Marti Friedlander (1928–2016) - one of New Zealand’s most outstanding and influential photographers - made portraits of artists, writers, potters, actors, film makers and musicians from 1959 to 2015. This was a conscious project on her part, initially motivated by her belief that creative people in the arts did not receive the public recognition they deserved from mainstream New Zealand society.

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Stars start falling

Stars start falling brings together existing and newly commissioned works by Teuane Tibbo, Ani O’Neill and Salome Tanuvasa, many seen here in public for the first time.

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The moon was talking

West Auckland photographer Edith Amituanai MNZM presents a series of portraits made with Year 11 art students at Kelston Girls College through the Ministry of Education’s Creatives in Schools initiative.

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Steve Carr: In Bloom

In bloom was developed by artist Steve Carr during his 2020 residency at McCahon House in nearby French Bay. Cast in bronze from car tyres and presented with living plants, In bloom presents a contrast in materials to provide a moment of reflection on states of permanence and change.

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Antireality perversion void

Building upon her own transdisciplinary art practice, recent McCahon House artist in residence, Jess Johnson, has curated a collection of ceramic objects by makers who work from the underbelly of contemporary ceramics, where the gothic, punk, macabre, mythological, and magikal prevail.

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Portage 21

The Portage Ceramic Awards are an annual showcase of contemporary ceramics in Aotearoa. After last year’s 20-year retrospective, which brought together the winning works from 2001 to 2019, this year marks the return of the open-call competition and includes new work made throughout 2020 and 2021.

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George Watson: Kotiro, Emepaea

Kōtiro, Emepaea is the first major solo exhibition by George Watson (Ngāti Porou, Moriori, Ngāti Mutunga) comprising a newly commissioned video and installation. The work draws on the artist’s ongoing interest in the literature and life of modernist writer Katherine Mansfield (1888-1923) in order to explore concepts of imagination, desire, belonging, and the politics of memory in settler Aotearoa.

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Louie Bretana: Tumingala sa tinitingala na mga tala

Auckland based Filipino artist Louie Bretaña expands on the role of stars as guides to both navigation and to life with a series of new suspended sculptures. Based on the design of the parol, traditional Christmas lanterns from the Philippines, each work reassigns the object with an indigenous narrative dedicated to a diwata (deity) and embellishes it with contemporary visual narratives by Bretaña. Connecting the old with the new is also a reminder of what was always there – using the figurative and literal action tingala (to look up). Visitors are welcome to lie on mats to view the sculptures, and receive blessings from each celestial deity.

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Rob McLeod: Jimmy gets nostalgic

Painter Rob McLeod continues to push the traditional boundaries of painting with this new body of work that challenges his nostalgia for Scotland. While the works themselves break form, so do his own thoughts, manifested in a range of characters that move and melt across the gallery walls and floor. They wear captivatingly wily and distorted references to tartan, bagpipes, songs and music that are inherently connected to the history of painting through colour, shape and form.

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Bruce Connew: A Vocabulary

To step mindfully onto the farmland to photograph a panorama of the battle site from both Māori and Pākehā points of view. After several footsteps, and with some bafflement, I stop dead in my tracks at a strange sensation deep inside my belly, which today I’m still unable clearly to throw light on. History was here, I grasp that, but this was out of that range. Does earth hold memory, and deliver that memory when the gravity is ripe? Over several recent years, photographer and artist Bruce Connew has roamed the many memorials and gravestones of Aotearoa’s colonial wars to seek out the texts on these testaments to folly. A vocabulary of colonisation.

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Finn Ferrier: Soft garniture

Finn Ferrier has always been toiling with rope. Lately, he has been creating vessels, or, ropeware objects in conversation with the history and his tacit knowledge of craft. The new and recent works on display in Ferrier’s new exhibition Soft Garniture use materiality to reveal the tension between the maker and the nature of the object. Informed by ceramics, Ferrier's sculptures explore the qualities and limitations of working with rope.

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Portage Ceramic Awards 2020

2020 marked the 20th anniversary of the Portage Ceramics Awards, which have become Aotearoa’s premier showcase for ceramic practice, organised annually by Te Uru. A special exhibition was planned to replace the traditional awards competition. Fondly known as ‘The Portage’, this year’s survey exhibition displayed all twenty winning works from previous years, spanning large scale installation to fine porcelain sculpture.

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NUku

Ehara taku toa i te toa takitahi, engari he toa takitini | My success should not be bestowed onto me alone, it was not individual success but the success of a collective NUku offers a ceramic journey from an indigenous perspective, bringing together both emergent and established artists as well as members of the Māori clay artist collective, Ngā Kaihanga Uku. Combining the concept of nuku, uku and inherently referencing Papatūānuku, NUku is an exhibition of ceramics that celebrates collaboration and indigenous culture. Whakapapa enriched, each artist brings their unique contribution, sharing a united passion. Together we are more. Presented alongside Portage 20/20

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Wayne Youle: Elevation

Te Uru presents an exhibition of new work by Wayne Youle, made during his studio residency at McCahon House in 2019. Spilling out from the Learning Centre Gallery into Te Uru’s stairwell, Elevation is anchored by a large sculpture that cuts across the centre of the gallery. This is based on the famously open-air children’s bunkroom underneath the McCahon cottage and brings an imagined section of McCahon House into the gallery. Throughout this exhibition, Youle mixes history with design and sculpture, demonstrating a deep engagement with the McCahon legacy.

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James Charlton: Thrown

Testing the limits of interactive art, James Charlton’s THROWN is a major new installation to experience at Te Uru this spring. A series of free-standing mechanical structures will populate the gallery like strange sporting equipment, programmed and loaded with hundreds of tennis balls, ready to be released into the air and collected by a team of voluntary agents.

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On the Last Afternoon: Disrupted Ecologies and the Work of Joyce Campbell

On the Last Afternoon: Disrupted Ecologies and the Work of Joyce Campbell was the first substantial presentation of artist Joyce Campbell’s photo-and media-based practice, first held at the Adam Art Gallery Te Pataka Toi in 2019. The exhibition was originally developed in dialogue with the architecture of the Adam Art Gallery and is now re-staged within Te Uru’s similarly unique gallery environment.

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Tim Wagg: Working Towards Meaning

Auckland-based artist Tim Wagg works across a variety of mediums including video, installation and digital painting. His work explores the intersections of politics, identity and technology within the context of New Zealand. He considers the tangibility of archives and histories, and examines the visual languages surrounding moments of political change.

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Philippa Blair: Down under cover

A feast for the eyeballs after our recent screen-centric lock down, Te Uru presents Down under cover, an energetic series of paintings by internationally renowned contemporary artist Philippa Blair.

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Thinking about Thinking about the future

A new group exhibition, developed over the lockdown period, that thinks about the future through the current moment. If this era of pandemic-driven flux could be visualised, what would it look like? In the past few months, feelings of uncertainty have combined with decisive action to create a future that seems constantly just out of reach. If these strange times could tell us anything, however, it is that the future is always just out of reach, like a strange new constellation of stars in the distant sky or a rainbow appearing intermittently on the horizon.

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The Future of Our Kids

This exhibition brings together works from two international artists; Jane Chang Mi (Honolulu; Los Angeles) and Torika Bolatagici (Melbourne). Together, their works reflect an intergenerational approach that priorities future political, personal and sociological wellbeing. How we understand the past in the present moment is vitally informed by concerns for future generations.

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Contemporary wood-carved Netsuke

As kimono culture flourished during the Edo period (1603-1868), netsuke, small carvings, were created as toggles to hold pouches and cases containing tobacco and medicine in place on the obi sash worn with the kimono.

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Portage Ceramic Awards 2019

This year's event has been judged by renowned Australian potter and educator, Merran Esson. Esson has been working internationally for more than 40 years but this will be her first visit to Aotearoa. Her own work is distinctive for the textures and large forms that express the contrast between the extremes of country and city. She uses clay and glazes to reference water tanks, silos and corrugated iron, which remind us of the influence of history and place, and recall her rural childhood.

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Split Level View Finder: Theo Schoon and New Zealand Art

Theo Schoon (1915–85) is a controversial figure. He was born in Java to Dutch parents, but educated back in the Netherlands at the Rotterdam Academy of Fine Arts. He arrived in Aotearoa New Zealand in 1939, where he would become a catalyst for modernism. The first comprehensive exhibition of Schoon’s art in decades, Split Level View Finder rethinks his legacy for 21st–century Aotearoa.

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Design and Innovation at Green Bay High School

This exhibition celebrates the creative talents and innovative designs that have been produced by local students from Design and Visual Communication, Product Design and Fashion Design at Green Bay High School. Students were challenged to think about real world problems in design and manufacturing. Creating design solutions in conjunction with genuine clients, local community and industries, students see how decisions are made around aesthetics, function and materials to influence final outcomes.

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Sarah Cameron Sunde, 36.5 - A Durational Performance with the Sea

36.5 / A Durational Performance with the Sea is a series of nine site-specific participatory performances and video artworks by New York-based interdisciplinary artist Sarah Cameron Sunde, spanning six continents and seven years (2013–2020). In each, Sunde stands in a tidal area for 12-13 hours as water engulfs her body and then reveals it again. It is a radical call to reconsider our relationship with water as individuals, as communities, and as a species.

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Campaign

Drawing upon the work of significant New Zealand artists, Campaign considers the prevalence of anti-nuclear sentiment in New Zealand’s art history. It revisits an era when artists across a range of disciplines were documenting, exposing and protesting the dangers of nuclear testing in the Pacific and the arrival of nuclear-capable warships into New Zealand waters.

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Nicola Farquhar: Listening, twitching

A convergence of vibrant colours and fluid geometric forms result in a new series of paintings by Nicola Farquhar that almost vibrate with organic life, microscopically moving between the inner and outer spaces of abstracted feminine forms.

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Pusi Urale: Mafine - Celebrating the Female form

Mafine is a solo exhibition of acrylic paintings on canvas inspired by the female form. 81-year-old Samoan artist, Pusi Urale, explores abstract painting and pointillism using vibrant colours to express her unique point of view. This exhibition draws on her extensive knowledge of Polynesian patterns and flora native to the Moana Nui a Kiwa.

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Small Space: Rowan Panther

Rowan Panther creates fine lace textiles using muka fibres that examine the divide between art and craft. Working consciously in an Aotearoa context, Panther considers the complexities of colonisation, as well as her own Irish/English/European/Samoan heritage, by bringing contemporary Pacific interpretations to traditional European lace-making practices.

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Diversity: Titirangi Primary School

This exhibition is a biennial presentation of art produced by students from Titirangi Primary School. It is the culmination of a term of learning that focuses on the important understanding that the diversity within our community inspires creativity, which we can appreciate through art. Students have explored printmaking, painting, construction and clay modelling to create wonders that have been influenced both by their local community and by ideas from across the world.

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YOUNG-HAE CHANG HEAVY INDUSTRIES PRESENTS SOME GRAPHIC SEX, HEAVY DRINKING, BLOODY VIOLENCE, AND DIRTY LANGUAGE?

For this exhibition, YOUNG-HAE CHANG HEAVY INDUSTRIES presents an hour-long programme of nine works, including WA'AD, an 18-minute work about a Palestinian astronaut who lives on Mars with other astronauts. Across all of the works simmers the question of whether new human achievements actually improve the lot of humanity, or increase a growing sense of isolation and alienation.

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Moana Currents: Dressing Aotearoa Now

Moana Currents: Dressing Aotearoa Now is an exhibition presented by the New Zealand Fashion Museum in partnership with Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery, showing how various threads drawn from across the Moana (Pacific Ocean) are being woven together to produce a new identity in which we can comfortably cloak ourselves in Aotearoa today.

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Parallel Universe: The Art and Design of Roy Good

Parallel Universe: The Art and Design of Roy Good is an exhibition that celebrates the 50-year parallel careers of Roy Good as both a designer and painter. It draws attention to Good’s pioneering work for New Zealand television from the late 1960s, alongside his early forays into modernist abstract painting, as well as featuring paintings from the last decade – a highly productive period of renewed energy and innovation.

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twenty-four-seven

From 16-hour work days to the dim light of a laptop on all night or the strict hands of the clock itself, three artists consider the traps of ‘twenty-four-seven’ time. Recurrent across the works is the spectre of fantasy and dreams. Arguably belonging to the realm of sleep, the last bastion against productivity, dreams, fantasies and other drifts hold an uneasy position in these works. Will they be subsumed into systems of production and consumption, or can they offer a way out of the always here, always now?

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2018 Portage Ceramic Awards

This year’s Portage Ceramic Awards was judged by American artist Bari Ziperstein. Ziperstein is at the forefront of a thriving ceramic scene in Los Angeles. Te Uru was pleased to announce local Henderson duo Sang-Sool Shim and Keum-Sun Lee as the Premier Award Winners in the 2018 Portage Ceramic Awards, for their piece, In the Beautiful Dream.

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Small Space: Jane Dodd

In recent years Jane Dodd’s jewellery practice has pivoted around the portrayal of animals. With a subtext of human impact and interaction she has explored issues of extinction and infestation, cruelty and conflict. In the new works that form The Family she asserts the place of the human species within the animal world; in the taxonomic Order of Primates. Character and narrative are given to humans, pre-human hominids and other fellow simians alike.

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Kelly McDonald: Portrait of Jewellery

Wellington-based jeweller Kelly McDonald uses materials from traditionally masculine and utilitarian fields for creating objects of fine art. Having grown up in rural Australia amidst the largest brown coal deposit in the Southern Hemisphere, the industrial geography of the opencast mine influences all aspects of her creative practice, including material choices, the crafting of her objects and the historical and visual rhythms of her work.

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Envoys Onwards

In 1993, the Association of Women Artists initiated a celebratory exhibition of postcards to mark the 100-year anniversary of the winning of emancipation by New Zealand women. The exhibition was held in 1996 at what was then called Lopdell House Gallery (now Te Uru). Now, in 2018, in the 125th anniversary year of that achievement, Te Uru and representatives of the association will be re-showing the original postcards and inviting a new generation of women artists to create postcards to show alongside the original set.

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Billy Apple: The Cut Away

This Small Space project is an institutional Critique by Billy Apple, who has proposed that Te Uru fill in the cut away to complete the south wall of Gallery One. This is part of an ongoing series, started in the 1970s, in which Apple has critiqued the ways that exhibition spaces function. In doing so, he makes the institutional context the subject of his work, and therefore the gallery itself becomes the work.

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From the Shore

From the Shore considers the influence of M?ori filmmakers Barry Barclay and Merata Mita on a current generation of artists. Through their work in film, television and writing, Barclay and Mita set out some core concerns of indigenous filmmaking internationally, ranging from control over production through to community-based models of filming and upending technical conventions, such as staged interviews. Featuring work by Tracey Moffatt, Tanu Gago, Rob George, Nova Paul, Lisa Reihana and Tuafale Tanoa'i aka Linda T.

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Maureen Lander: Flat-Pack Whakapapa

For Flat-Pack Whakapapa, Maureen Lander has created three installations that explore the connections between whakapapa and raranga (M?ori weaving). Approaching these forms of human connection from a m?tauranga M?ori (M?ori knowledge) perspective, Lander engages with weaving techniques—including whiri (braiding) and whakairo (patterning)—and the concept of aho tuku iho (ancestral lines handed down continuously from generation to generation).

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'A way through’ Colin McCahon's Gate III

Literally a ‘one painting’ exhibition, ‘A way through’ offers three thematic entry points into McCahon’s work: addressing its material history as a commissioned artwork destined for a university collection; locating it within McCahon’s artistic output; and as a lens on the fraught socio-political times in which it was painted. These themes are drawn out in the accompanying archival material especially gathered for the occasion.

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Josephine Cachemaille: FEELS

Heaped, hanging, climbing and draping, FEELS is an installation by artist Josephine Cachemaille. Working with a range of precious, crafted and familiar objects, FEELS composes hybrid sculpture/paintings into a lively, suggestive and humorous assemblage.

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Nga Tohu o Te Kawerau a Maki: the people, their stories and treasures

Ka titiro whakamuri, me anga whakamua - We look back so that we forge ahead! Te Kawerau a Maki present a collection of images of tupuna (forebears) and taonga (treasures) to remember and celebrate their heritage as they work toward a better future.

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Moanaroa: Home of the Pacifica Mamas

As part of the exhibition names held in our mouths, West Auckland’s Pacifica Mamas will be taking over the Learning Centre Gallery, renaming it Moanaroa: Home of the Pacifica Mamas. Embracing a warm and informal approach, the Mama’s occupation of the gallery rejects a division between art and life. Collections of works, laughter and materials to tutu with all share the same space.

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Dark Horizons

Dark Horizons is a suite of three interconnected solo exhibitions exploring this state of global anxiety through the lens of Muslim migrant communities in Australia. The artists in the exhibition are Malaysian and Anglo-Australian brothers Abdul Abdullah and Abdul-Rahman Abdullah, and leading Lebanese-Australian moving image artist Khaled Sabsabi.

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names held in our mouths

For Blind Carbon Copy: An Open Love Letter, Amodeo delves into the representation and signifiers of intimacy. Working autobiographically, this series of works addresses the placeholders used to acknowledge and commemorate romantic relationships, where poignancy sits alongside an inevitable inefficacy.

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Gabrielle Amodeo: Blind Carbon Copy: an open love letter

For Blind Carbon Copy: An Open Love Letter, Amodeo delves into the representation and signifiers of intimacy. Working autobiographically, this series of works addresses the placeholders used to acknowledge and commemorate romantic relationships, where poignancy sits alongside an inevitable inefficacy.

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Stephen Ellis: Headforemost

For this exhibition Stephen Ellis reimagines the settling of William Cornwallis Symonds' unbuilt city at Cornwallis, the last remnant of which is its rebuilt wharf. Ellis reimagines the settlement through scale models, which serve as the basis for a series of large ballpoint pen drawings.

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Erica van Zon: Jade Tableau

For Jade Tableau, Wellington-based artist Erica van Zon continues a yearlong project of working with the colour green, engaging two sites at Te Uru: the external Window Space and the Small Space located inside. For this project Van Zon finds prompts for creativity throughout her immediate surroundings, where the shimmering surface of water, the trellis at a fruit shop or the cladding of a building can all be of interest to the artist.

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Marie Shannon: Rooms found only in the home

Sensitive, authentic and funny, Marie Shannon’s photography and video works present contemporary art as an intimate and immediate occupation. Rooms found only in the home is developed out of holdings of Marie Shannon’s works in the Dunedin Public Art Gallery collection and the artist’s personal archive. The exhibition explores the intersecting spheres of her practice; considering her different conceptual interests and dual focus on photography and video.

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Phillip Fickling: The Fragile Sea

Phillip Fickling is a paper engineer with a significant background in handcrafted paper objects, books and sculptures. In this exhibition Fickling presents a display of carefully sculpted paper creatures - part animal, part machine - of a fictional era inspired by industrial design. The still and stark white paper gives way to imagined colours, movements and interactions between the underwater beings swimming through the exhibition space.

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From Scratch: 546 Moons

Auckland Arts Festival and Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery present an interactive survey exhibition on the sonic innovation and invented instruments of renowned art/music ensemble From Scratch, including six performances by the latest incarnation of the group. Formed in 1974, From Scratch have performed to wide acclaim around the world with their distinctive invented instruments – 546 moon cycles and still spinning!

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Window Space: Glen Hayward

Using only wood and paint, artist Glen Hayward constructs a wall of concrete blocks to site a series of pre-existing objects in Te Uru’s front Window Space. These recognisable builder’s objects – including a beer bottle, lunchbox, cigarettes and hard hat – point to the mode of their own construction and labour intensive origins.

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Mark Harvey: Drop the Ball

Drop the Ball is a collaborative live performance and exhibition project by local artist, Mark Harvey. This project brings artist Mark Harvey into collaboration with Woodlands Park Primary School's Year 5/6 students, who have invented sculptural forms to be used in a performance.

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Kerry Ann Lee: life should be simple and good

For this commissioned project, Lee continues her interest in the relationship between craft, identity and place by drawing upon the specialist craft knowledge and legacies associated with West Auckland. The Learning Centre gallery is re-imagined as a whimsical garden - a space loaded with concepts of home and belonging. Here, visitors are invited to create a pot plant with twigs, clay and paper.

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Pocket Histories

Pocket Histories — developed in collaboration between curator Ioana Gordon-Smith and artist Imogen Taylor as the latter’s McCahon House post-residency exhibition — considers the sampling of modernism in the work of three artists. Together, these works show a clear interest in formal geometric play; the push, pull and fit of volume, shapes, curves, colour.

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Blood Water Earth

Blood Water Earth is an immersive video installation and ceramic display arising out of an international Indigenous collaboration between Kahnyen’kehàka artist Santee Smith (Artistic Director of Kaha:wi Dance Theatre) and Ngai Tahu video/dance artist Louise Potiki Bryant.

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Small Space: Manon van Kouswijk

Ornamental Residue originates from a study into the typology of brooches. For this series, Melbourne-based jeweller Manon van Kouswijk applies a range of processes and abstractions to iconic brooch forms and motifs from the history of jewellery. These brooches are formed by pouring liquid clay over a series of tightly grouped spherical forms, leaving an inverse of her original creations – a residue of her processes made wearable.

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Whau the People: Residents in Residence

Residents in Residence is a show about local artists making work in and about their community. For their last month in New Lynn, Lopdell House Gallery are joining forces with local arts collective Whau the People, encouraging them to take over their building and make the exhibition spaces their own...

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Gavin Hipkins: The Homely II

The images in the Homely II were taken in the United Kingdom and New Zealand between 2001-2017. It is the sequel to Gavin Hipkins’ celebrated series The Homely(1997-2001), which created conversations and conflicts between pictures from New Zealand and Australia. This new series is presented in an identical format, as an 80-photo frieze, entirely shot on an amateur film camera.

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Portage Ceramic Awards 2017

For the first time in its now 17 year history, a New Zealander has been appointed to judge the Awards, Aotearoa’s best-known survey of contemporary ceramic activity. Whanganui-based curator and writer Emma Bugden has selected finalists and winners for this year.

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Sorawit Songsataya: Jupiter

In the exhibition Jupiter, artist Sorawit Songsataya draws us towards the horizon, an in-between space that binds, yet remains neither land or sky. Operating in this liminal zone, and animated by the unseen forces of wind, the humble form of the kite brings together an oscillating range of references, connecting local traditions with a grander social fabric; the handmade with the digitised; land with clouds.

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Collection Classics: One Tree Hill College Art Collection

Described as an experiment in art education, the One Tree Hill College Art Collection has grown into a world-class collection containing examples of some of Aotearoa’s most cherished artists. This presentation showcases work from Wallace Crossman, Sandy Adsett, Robin White and Haare Williams, four artists significant for their contributions to both art and education in Aotearoa.

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Louise Menzies: Gorgon Malkin Witch

Louise Menzies offers us objects, images and situations that explore the past and present through attention to the way they are already represented. For this exhibition, Menzies delves into feminist histories, via the Germaine Greer Archive held at the University of Melbourne.Lissaman.

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Leading Ladies

This exhibition looks at the work of five key female potters working in the early twentieth century with the aim of understanding how their contexts enabled their work and shaped the directions their practices took. Curated by Moyra Elliott, with work by Briar Gardner, Elizabeth Matheson, Minnie F. White, Olive Jones and Elizabeth Lissaman.

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Small Space: Zoe Brand

Zoe Brand is a Canberra-based artist who uses text to explore the performative nature of jewellery as a device for communication. Using readymade and archetypal jewellery forms, Brand explores language that can both describe her objects and the people wearing them, while initiating conceptual dialogue between the object and its audience.

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Emma Fitts In the Rough: Parts 1, 2 & 3

Fitts’ work pays particular attention to how different taxonomies render new readings of the same conditions, highlighting or even erasing certain details. It’s fitting that Te Uru’s own architecture is subsumed into the exhibition, with design interventions intended to draw attention to particularities.

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Rob George: a memoir for falling light

George's new experimental film explores the psychological and emotional impact of an impending loss. Multiple channels are employed to entangle the often contradictory stories we tell and the coping mechanisms we adopt to deal with fear and heartache.

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Black Rainbow: Ralph Hotere and Michael Parekowhai

This exhibition was developed by Te Papa and features a selection of ‘black paintings’ by the late Ralph Hotere, some of his best known works. They sit alongside Michael Parekowhai’s sculptural work, an intricately carved Steinway grand piano titled He K?rero Pur?kau mo Te Awanui o Te Motu: Story of a New Zealand river.

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Christine Hellyar: Looking, Seeing, Thinking

Acclaimed Auckland-based artist Christine Hellyar has long been interested in how people see and depict the landscape. Working with a range of materials and formats, she presents here botanical drawings of a flooded Coastland Broadleaf Forest in the Waitakere Ranges, printed life-size onto silk alongside sculptural textile figures and upholstered furniture.

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Sarah Smuts-Kennedy: Light Language

Light Language takes its cue from Colin McCahon’s description of November light, as 'a miracle' which he experienced during his first year living in Titirangi. Using the daily occurrence and healing potential of light, Smuts-Kennedy shows drawings made both during and after her residency, as well as sculptural works that suggest tools that may be used to engage with the field.

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Tiffany Singh: Life is but a Vapour

Life Is But A Vapour is a presentation of processes from Singh’s residency. Specifically, the exhibition features an offering wall, which houses many of the messages, mementoes and keepsakes offered by visitors, alongside a sacred receptacle containing ash from the ceremony.

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Collection Classics: Lois McIvor

McIvor proved to be a prolific painter, with a career spanning over five decades. She developed a consistent art practice, recognisable by a distinctively refined colour palette and simplified forms, while the beautiful coastline of West Auckland and the hills of the Waitakere Ranges were of undeniable significance to her uniquely personal and poetic vision of the world around her.

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Oliver Perkins: Japanese Laurel

Oliver Perkins produces works that are suggestive reminders of paintings' relationship to common objects, making reference to art histories, the potential of materials, and cognitive thought processes, all as prompts for an intensive studio practice.

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The Asia Pacific Century: Part Two

The Asia-Pacific Century is an ongoing project prompted by the growth of Aotearoa New Zealand’s Maori, Asian, and Pacific populations, with Statistics New Zealand projecting that these groups are set to collectively make up 52% of the total population in 2038 (up from 35% in 2013).

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Lonnie Hutchinson and Reuben Paterson: Relative Reciprocity

Lonnie Hutchinson and Reuben Paterson are renowned contemporaries; two artists who have firmly embedded M?ori and Polynesian world-views and visual languages into their practices. This exhibition brings their work together to explore the recurring aesthetic, political and spiritual use of light and darkness that runs through Hutchinson and Paterson’s works.

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Homeworld: Kathy Barry and Isobel Thom

Combining the experimental geometries of drawing and ceramics, Kathy Barry and Isobel Thom work within the restraints—both ethical and practical—of a world of interconnecting matter.

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Roger Ballen's Theatre of the Mind

Roger Ballen is one of the most important photographers of his generation. He was born in New York in 1950 but has been living and working in South Africa for over 30 years. Over the past thirty years his distinctive style of photography has evolved using a simple square format in stark and beautiful black and white.

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Portage Ceramic Awards 2014

The Portage Ceramic Awards exhibition is an annual showcase for the diversity of ceramic artists throughout New Zealand. Established in 2001, the awards are the country’s best-known barometer for developments in the field of ceramics.

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Takeshi Yasuda: Recent Work

This year’s Portage Ceramic Awards judge, Takeshi Yasuda, brings with him an intimate selection of his own recent domestic ware. Yasuda’s early work consisted of ash-glazed stoneware, after which he explored Sancai and Creamware.

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Te Hau a Uru: A Message from the West

The traditional Maori name for the Waitakere Ranges is Te Wao Nui a Tiriwa – The Great Forest of Tiriwa. This vast forested tract is the ancestral home of Te Kawerau ? Maki, who have gifted the gallery its new name - Te Uru.

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Amy Howden-Chapman: They Say Ten Thousand Years

It is claimed that nuclear waste will remain dangerous for ten thousand years. Although this simplifies and understates the danger, ten thousand years is still almost impossible to imagine. The difficulty suggests a need for caution.

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Activating Te Uru: Inaugural Opening Exhibition

Activating Te Uru was held at Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery to celebrate the opening of Te Uru after two years of construction.

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Watching Windows

In this exhibition, presented amidst the elevated skyscapes of Titirangi and developed in collaboration between artist André Hemer and curator Andrew Clifford, an international network of artists negotiate the physical and digital interplay of light and space as a way to communicate ideas of place – locally, globally and imagined.

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James Cousins: Restless Idiom

James Cousins has long been interested in the contingencies that painting relies upon: how do we recognise an image? What systems guide our understanding? What processes might be used to disrupt these assumptions?

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Campbell Patterson: Honky Tonkin'

Campbell Patterson turns quotidian or everyday activities into monomaniacal encounters. He is known for economically viable, unspectacular actions that are obsessively repeated and documented according to an underlying formal methodology. Though his practice crosses over a number of mediums, with a specific reputation for performance and painting, it is notably the pen that is Patterson’s primary tool in this exhibition.

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Richard Stratton:Old Zealand New

In 2013, ceramicist Richard Stratton was awarded the Portage Ceramic Awards residency at Guldagergaard in Denmark, which he took up in 2015. For Stratton the residency offered an opportunity to further his research of European and Scandinavian ceramics, from mudlarking on the bank of the Thames to handling 17th century stoneware at the Westerwald Keramik Museum in Germany.

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Seung Yul Oh: HaaPoom

HaaPoom takes its title from the Korean word for ‘yawn’, an infectious and often involuntary act. The reference continues artist Seung Yul Oh’s interest in exploring creativity, expression and surprise. Working from the simplest of materials, he transforms everyday experiences into unexpected encounters that are activated by audiences.

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The Brain

The Brain, curated by artist Christina Read, is an exhibition of video works presented within a sculptural installation, designed and constructed by artist Paul Cullen. The Brain could be seen as an idiosyncratic spatial and conceptual diagram of a brain, using video to map questions both academic and amateur.

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With Bold Needle and Thread

Perhaps best known as a columnist and commentator, Wellington-based McLeod is also an avid collector with an eye for the overlooked: many of the objects in her collection, made between 1920-1960, come from op shops, charity stores, Trade Me and friends who know of her ongoing passion for domestic handcraft.

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Yukihiro Taguchi: Pokepoke

Using everyday materials found in his immediate vicinity, Yukihiro Taguchi creates fleeting formations that are animated through stop-motion techniques. In a constant flux of things becoming and disassembling, he revels in the potential for reinvention, performance and play embedded in any place, and the delight that can come from a familiar or found object acting in an entirely unexpected way.

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Kindred

To be associated by origin, nature or qualities is to be kindred. This show brings together a selection of furniture designers whose work shares an interest in making work informed by a distinctly New Zealand point of view. Photo: Sam Hartnett.

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Learning Centre Gallery 2017

This year the Learning Centre Gallery has seen many exciting projects and exhibitions including TEMP: O-Tu-Kapua - (What Clouds See), Kelston Girls College: Project Kai, ZEAL: Connect, Gatherings on the Manukau, Fly the Flag for Gender Equality and Two4Nine: A Supported Life.

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Jacqueline Fahey: Where my eye leads

Jacqueline Fahey is one of Aotearoa’s foremost artists. Though best-known for her iconic paintings made in the 1970s, Fahey has consistently been attentive to the everyday world both around and within her home, from scenes observed along Karangahape Road and Williamson Avenue to the ebbs of family life.

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Caroline McQuarrie: No Town

Wellington artist Caroline McQuarrie grew up on the West Coast of the South Island and had long been interested in the history of the region. Over the last three years, she has been researching and visiting sites where communities sprung up around gold or coal, and have since vanished as the resources ran out.

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Cushla Donaldson: The Fairy Falls

The Fairy Falls, a solo exhibition by T?maki Makaurau-based artist Cushla Donaldson, negotiates the world of finance we inhabit in which the Markets have an omnipotent presence. In the world of finance, objects are counted according to an abstract quantification which registers price differentials and looks for ways in which the differences between objects are tradable with a view to seizing value.

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The Exquisite Wound

The Exquisite Wound is an interdisciplinary installation by visual artist Rebecca Swan in collaboration with composer Charlie Ha, engineer Peter Swan, light artist Peter Stoneham, and scientist David Shillington. The works contemplate how we relate to the disappearance of our physical bodies, which begs the question, “what are we without them?”

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Picturing Asia: Double Take: The Photography of Brian Brake and Steve McCurry

Stunning images, complex narratives, a fascinating conversation: pictures of Asia by two of the great masters of documentary photography. Picturing Asia: Double Take pairs and contrasts the work of New Zealander Brian Brake (1927-1988), and American Steve McCurry (born 1950).

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Window Space 2017

This year's front Window Space at Te Uru sees work from Jeremy Leatinu'u, Lonnie Hutchinson, Reuben Paterson, Brit Bunkley and Judy Darragh.

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Unseen City: Gary Baigent, Rodney Charters and Robert Ellis in Sixties Auckland

In the 1960s, Auckland was changing. It was becoming the big smoke. New motorways were enabling low-density suburban sprawl (the population had just passed half a million) and a counterculture was emerging. Unseen City offers a slice of 1960s Auckland through the eyes of then-young artists Gary Baigent, Rodney Charters and Robert Ellis.

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Billy Apple: Sound Works 1968-2015

Billy Apple was at the heart of British art when it went Pop in the ‘60s. In the ‘70s he opened an alternative space for conceptual art in New York. In the ‘80s his canvases revealed the behind-the-scenes of the art market. And he has been here in Auckland since the ‘90s, testing the system to show how art infiltrates life...

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Small Space 2017

Using the landing of the floating staircase behind Gallery One, Small Space is dedicated to and supports contemporary jewellery and object-making practices. This year's Small Space programme at Te Uru sees work from Kim Whalen, Emily Siddell and Chris Charteris, Hannah Valentine, Clementine Edwards and Sharon Fitness.

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Five by Five: New Conversations with Clay

Five by Five reprises the format of showing five works from five artists who experiment on the fringes of ceramic practice. Five artists — Kate Fitzharris, Tessa Laird, Kate Newby, Louise Rive and Suji Park — each straddle the divide between craft and fine arts, promising to again challenge perceptions about what can be said about clay, with clay.

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HEAT: Solar Revolutions

We are now in an era of HEAT: the Earth is quite literally heating up, with new global temperature records set every month and year, but there is also a warming of interest in more climate-friendly ways to live. HEAT: Solar Revolutions is an art event that asks how the sun’s energy may catalyse climate-friendly conversations, collective actions, speculations and interventions.

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His Own Steam: A Barry Brickell Survey

Barry Brickell is one of New Zealand’s most important potters, and a major figure in the development of a distinctive, indigenous art. From his early days as a potter in the 1950s, Brickell trusted his own original wit and invention. Using coarse local clays and hybrid forms he developed a unique sensibility, which resonates with this part of the Pacific.

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Gregor Kregar: Lost World Glass

Over summer, our front window space will be taken over by works from Gregor Kregor’s Lost World series, as well as escaping into the gallery. Based in New Lynn, Kregar is known for works that playfully question our understanding of objects through scale, repetition and materiality.

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The Kauri Project: A Delicate Balance

Inhabiting the space where concepts of art, science and cultural knowledge intersect, The Kauri Project is a curatorial endeavour which examines the relationship between people and landscape, focusing on our unique and threatened indigenous kauri forest ecology. Encompassing performance, sound, photography and sculptural installation, A Delicate Balance explores how we ‘listen’ and speak back to this environment, bringing together new and existing work by artists from Northland, Auckland and Taranaki.

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Curiosity Corner:Summer 2015/2016

The Curiosity Corner is a specific exhibition space dedicated to showcasing and supporting contemporary jewellery practice. This year we showcase work by jewellers Jasmine Watson, Rachel Bell, Johanna Zellmer, Selina Shanti Woulfe, Kirsten Haydon, Sarah Walker-Holt, Laura Jer and Chloe Rose Taylor.

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Daniel Malone: Titirangi Apocrypha

Daniel Malone’s conceptually-driven but wide-ranging practice has frequently been characterised by a keen engagement with context. For Titirangi Apocrypha, Malone returns to New Zealand from Poland with the productive distance of his recent travels to mine both the art practice and the subsequent art historisication of renowned artist Colin McCahon.

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IOIOIOIOIOIO: Fred Harrison and Tracey Tawhiao

Through the language of geometry, sound, and binary code, M?ori artists Tracey Tawhiao and Fred Harrison depict the Creator, known in Te Ao M?ori as IO, through sacred geometry that exudes m?tauranga M?ori; the knowledge originating from the ancestors.

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Portage Ceramic Awards 2001

It is with a considerable sense of pleasure that Lopdell House Gallery, in association with the Portage Charitable Foundation, presents the inaugural Portage Ceramic Awards, an exhibition of award winners and finalists.The judge of the Portage Ceramic Awards 2001, is Mitsuo Shoji of Japan, now based in Australia.

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Portage Ceramic Awards 2002

This is the second year that the Portage Ceramic Awards have been staged, with the generous sponsorship of the Portage Charitable Foundation. The award has re-established ceramics as an integral part of New Zealand’s contemporary arts platform and the exhibition of finalists celebrates the richness and diversity of contemporary ceramics around the country.

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Portage Ceramic Awards 2003

It is with considerable pleasure that Lopdell House Gallery, in association with the Portage Trust, present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2003. The award is now in its third year and is fast becoming a highlight of the annual arts calendar. This year’s judge, Australian ceramicist Julie Bartholomew, is a widely known and esteemed practitioner and academic, who aims to fuse ceramic tradition with new technologies, generating an ever evolving voice to ceramic practice.

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Portage Ceramic Awards 2004

This year the Portage Ceramic Awards have seen artists from a broad range of backgrounds and locations, and present a wide and disparate range of styles, techniques and compositions. This years judge, Patsy Hely, is a practicing artist and University lecturer based in Canberra, Australia. Her initial ceramic training was at East Sydney Technical College, and she also holds a MA from Southern Cross University.

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Portage Ceramic Awards 2005

The Portage Ceramic Awards showcase New Zealand’s best ceramic work and provide an avenue to look at what is being done throughout the country at a particular moment in time. This year has seen an enormous increase of entrants from a wider geographical spread around the country. The 2005 judge, Robert Bell, selected 57 pieces from 241 entered works. The result is a vivacious show of wide variety.

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Portage Ceramic Awards 2006

This year’s selection, made by Australian judge, Bill Samuels, features an exciting collection of 51 pots and sculptures from across the country. Bill Samuels is Head of the Ceramics Department at the National Art School, Sydney. He has a long history and involvement both as a student, practitioner and teacher and has worked on the development of forms and glazes for about 30 years. Bill is regarded as one of the key Australian potters working in the woodfiring tradition and one of the most experienced and innovative in the use of Shino-type glazes.

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Portage Ceramic Awards 2007

The Portage Ceramic Awards returns for its 7th year. The John Green Waitakere Artist Award is also given for the first time, and is named in memory of the ceramicist, artist and musician John Green. The judge this year is Jeff Shapiro, a ceramicist of international renown who exhibits in his native New York, in Japan and internationally. Jeff has brought a rigorous and fresh approach to the process of judging and selecting the pieces for inclusion in the exhibition.

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Portage Ceramic Awards 2008

Lopdell House Gallery is pleased to announce that Grace Cochrane is this year’s judge for New Zealand’s leading ceramic awards for 2008. Born in New Zealand, she has a background in art and education, is now an independent curator and writer, and until late 2005 Grace Cochrane was the senior curator of Australian decorative arts and design at the Powerhouse Museum, Sydney. From a strong field of 170 entries, Grace has selected 50 outstanding finalists.

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Judy Millar:he Model World

Judy Millar's recent works seek to defy gravity as they twist and contort in space, activating Te Uru’s architecture. Working on both an exaggerated scale to build an overblown gesture in the gallery, and scaled down works that pop up from walls and floor, Millar’s The Model World will work with the slippages between painting, printing and three-dimensionality to provoke new experiences of looking and being in space.

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Portage Ceramic Awards 2009

This, the ninth Portage Ceramic Awards, exhibits a wide range of creative ceramic works from around New Zealand. These works have been selected by the judge Scott Chamberlin, Professor of Ceramics at the University of Colorado. His selection this year emphasises the creative and playful side of the ceramic canon in the ongoing dialectic between fine art and craft art.

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Portage Ceramic Awards 2010

Lopdell House Gallery and The Trusts Charitable Foundation are pround to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2010, now in its tenth year. This years judge Stephen Bowers is visiting from Adelaide, South Australia. Stephen is an award-winning ceramicist with works in many prestigious international institutions.

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Window Space 2015

This years Window Space includes artists Eve de Castro-Robinson and Sarah Guppy, The Noemi, Sorawit Songsataya, Paul Hartigan, Christina Read, Paul Cullen, Sam Morrison and the 2015 Portage Ceramic Awards judge Ingrid Murphy.

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Portage Ceramic AWARDS 2012

This year we’re taking the show to the city with a week-long celebration of ceramics at The Cloud during Art Week in October. The jurist for 2012, Dr. Paul Scott, awarded the Premier Award to Jim Cooper for his piece Millbrook holiday [the league for spritual discovery].

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Portage Ceramic Awards 2013

Lopdell House Gallery and The Trusts Community Foundation are delighted to facilitate the Trusts Portage Ceramic Awards 2013. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of talented artists nationwide who work in a medium that wins the hearts of makers, collectors and the general public like no other.

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Shannon Novak: Cryptocosmos

Artist Shannon Novak asserts that ‘music is in everything.’ He creates compositions for objects, locations, and people much as musicians might compose for or about places, persons or experiences with emotional resonance for them.

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The Anniversary Show: 30 Years Later

This exhibition launches our commemorative year with a slice of history sampled from the last three decades through publications, ephemera and documentation. It takes a tentative and subjective view of Te Uru’s extensive archives to approach the story of West Auckland as a place for risk-taking, and the gallery as a thriving site for contemporary practices, where many important artists have taken significant formative steps.

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A Table of One's Own: The Creative Life of Anne McCahon

Trained in the 1930s, Anne McCahon (nee Hamblett – 1915-1993) emerged as part of a lively South Island art scene, often venturing into the countryside on painting trips with fellow artists Doris Lusk, Toss and Edith Woollaston, and her soon-to-be husband, Colin.

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Portage Ceramic Awards 2016

The 2016 judge is Janet DeBoos, an influential ceramic artist and teacher. Based in Canberra, Janet brings a wealth of experience to the awards, including a keen understanding of the social power of pottery and the varying contexts of production.

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Jasmine Togo-Brisby: Bitter Sweet

Working with cultural memory, intergenerational trauma, discovery of ancestral remains on plantations, and vitally important healing practices, Togo-Brisby's art practice is one of very few islander artists delving into our shared histories of plantation colonisation across the Pacific.

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Andrew Ananda Voogel: Kalapani: The Jahajis’ Middle Passage

Shortly after the abolition of the African slave trade, sugar cane plantations were sustained by the labour of Indian indentured workers, who were forcibly taken from their homes. Indo-Caribbean artist Andrew Ananda Voogel, a descendent of the Jahajis of Guyana, a community whose ancestors were Indian indentured workers, recalls histories of violent departure and exile in his installations.

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John Parker: Cause and Effect

2016 marks 50 years since celebrated West Auckland artist John Parker started making pottery. To mark the occasion, we’re presenting a major exhibition and launching a new book, both titled John Parker: Cause and Effect, to survey his extraordinary 50-year career of breaking rules and redefining what it means to make pottery in Aotearoa.

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On Repeat: The Disruptive Copy

“In principle a work of art has always been reproducible”, opens Walter Benjamin in his famous essay ‘The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction’. From casting to photography to newer digital technologies, the multiplied artwork exists as a very real possibility, albeit mostly unrealised.

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Yukihiro Taguchi: In Formation

Berlin-based Japanese artist Yukihiro Taguchi creates playful and temporary interventions that engage with any given environment he finds himself in. Using everyday materials found in the immediate vicinity, Taguchi creates formations that are animated through stop-motion techniques.

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Jae Kang:Gurmon Sup

Jae Kang is an Auckland-based artist from Korea, and an avid tomato grower. Kang’s training in traditional Korean drawing – which consists of a series of slow, methodical strokes painted in ink – finds a surprising synergy with her prowess in gardening. Using irrigation piping as her material, Kang contours sinewy lines that swarm and coil together, evoking both unruly tendrils and an intricate three-dimensional drawing...

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Janet Lilo: Status Update

The exhibition Janet Lilo: Status Update is Lilo's first solo survey exhibition. A phrase cribbed from Facebook, ‘Status Update’ refers to her well-known interest in social media as material, a self-aware use of a survey exhibition as validation — and indeed elevation — of an artist’s practice, as well as a description of how Lilo has treated the works in the exhibition... Presented in association with Auckland Festival of Photography.

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uniform: Exchange

Uniform is a collective of female artists who have long been interested in employing underground sub-culture as a means to both acknowledge and create accessible, non-comformist sites of exchange...

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O-Tu-Kapua: My Personal Cloud

The Learning Centre is busy with students learning about air quality and creating clouds as part of a collaboration between TEMP, NIWA climate scientists and the F4 artist collective. This installation is about climate science and believing we can solve problems if everyone gets involved.

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Dan Arps: Plastic Mouthfeel III

Dan Arps’ Plastic Mouthfeel III responds to the physical environment of West Auckland, and in particular the pyscho-geography of its suburban fringes – the complexity of the local environs informs his latest body of work.

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Curiosity Corner 2016

The Curiosity Corner is a specific exhibition space dedicated to showcasing and supporting contemporary jewellery practice. The year 2016 saw projects by Sarah Watters, Joanna Campbell and Rowan Panther, Tineke Jansen, and the collaborative jewellery initiative CLINK.

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Yuki Kihara: A Study of a Samoan Savage

A Study of a Samoan Savage is a response, in part, to recent perceptions of Polynesian men as powerful but primitive players in Rugby culture, a phenomonen that echoes19th century treatment of Pacific peoples as athletic specimens, ripe for scientific study.

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Ilan Wittenberg: Faces of Jerusalem

Beggars and scholars, slaves and warriors have all walked the narrow paths of the Old City of Jerusalem. These lived experiences can often fall from focus in prominent cities like Jerusalem, where turbulent affairs prioritise the geo-political significance of spaces over the people who occupy them.

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Bepen Bhana: Frankie Goes to Bollywood

Produced in anticipation of his residency at McCahon House from January to April 2016, these large-scale diptych paintings based on photo-collages insert Bollywood film stars into West Auckland scenery.

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They Come from Far Away: A Performance Series

They come from far away is a live performance series featuring a mixture of visiting artists from Finland, Germany, the UK, across Aotearoa and other places. The series will explore notions of the familiar/unfamiliar, being alien/belonging, being foreign/local and being seen/unseen.

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Alex Monteith: Surface Movements Te Piha

For Surface Movements, leading New Zealand artist and former surf champion Alex Monteith collaborates with Piha communities connected with the ocean — particularly Piha surf schools — and works with them to develop a project that considers our ecological, cultural, political and economic relationships to the ocean through layered readings provided by surf instructors, surfers with a history at Piha and local tangata whenua.

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collection Classics 2016

We’re delighted to announce our new Collection Classics series: a revolving display of timeless works from important collections around the country. This series offers visitors the opportunity to experience first-hand works of major renown and art-historical significance, but seldom seen outside of their respective collection premises.

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Mary Macpherson: Old New World

With a keen eye for detail and irony, Wellington poet and photographer, Mary Macpherson has spent seven years travelling around the country documenting the changing face of small town New Zealand. This has culminated in an intriguing exhibition of 46 colour photographs along with a significant new book of New Zealand photography, entitled Old New World.

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Table Setting

It is a rare opportunity for visual artists to be assisted to turn their creative skills to a different media. But with the generous support of leading tableware manufacturer Studio Ceramics, six contemporary artists have had the opportunity to do just that. Chis Harvey, Director of Studio Ceramics, has kindly offered to open his factory to them and provided the technical support required to explore this medium.

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Clay Bodvin: Hybrid Memories and the Still Life of Trivial Objects

Clay Bodvin’s multi layered graphic works are like kaleidoscopes – rich in colour, pattern, texture and illusion. Originally from Seattle, but now a Titirangi resident, Bodvin’s new series of works have taken an autobiographical turn. Utilising photography, illustration and animation and imagery from his childhood, Bodvin has merged fragments of other times and places to create intriguing memory pictures.

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Marie Shannon: Ordinary Things

"My love of ordinary things is the basis of my art" Marie Shannon, 1997 This exhibition presents a survey of Marie Shannon's work over the last decade. It provides an opportunity to experience the development and changes in the artists' work over time, and to examine and consider her recurring themes and ideas.

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Lapa

Lapa (flashes of phosphorescent light) is a phenomenon recognisable to only the most experienced of Polynesian navigators. In conjunction with the bounce back wave, Lapa signalled to early navigators a change in the motion of the waka and indicated the presence and direction of land. Thus the journey of Polynesian art - having left the homeland - recognises the search for new directions and innovations.

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Ben Cauchi: The Lunar Apogee

Ben Cauchi, the 16th artist in residence at the McCahon House studio has spent the summer months creating a new series of work capturing his surroundings at French Bay – but in no ordinary way.

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Tree House: McCahon House Residency Five Years On

Tree House: McCahon Residency Five Years On features memento works from the 15 artists who have held the residency to date. Each work was made as part of a limited edition during their stay and sold to collectors to support the continuation of the residency programme by The McCahon House Trust.

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Envoys: Association of Women Artists International Postcard Project

Initiated by the Association of Women Artists in 1993 to mark the centenary of New Zealand's Womens Suffrage, Envoys takes a wilfully resistant position against the instant, impersonal and mass-audience modes of newest contemporary communication systems. While the internet can send messages to millions, the contributors to Envoys rejoice instead in the gentle intimacy of the personal, individually handmade postcard.

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Wood for the Trees

Wood for the Trees brings together five divergent artists (John Lyall, Michael Shepherd, Russell Moses, Tanya Ruka, Derek March) – incorporating sculpture, painting, history, mathematics, moving image, sound and photography – each with thought provoking visions of forests, and mankind’s use or misuse of them.

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Peter Siddell: Paintings 1970-2010

For those of us who live out West, Peter’s paintings have a special familiarity and resonance. A recurring view in Peter’s works is looking westwards towards the Waitakere Ranges, often displaying the dramatic lighting at dusk as the sun leaves the day. In recent years both Sir Peter and his wife, artist Dame Sylvia Siddell have been very unwell so we are particularly grateful to them and their family for making this exhibition possible.

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Wi Taepa: Hue

Ceramics by Wi Taepa

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Where Are We?

Where Are We? the exhibition, seeks to explore some of the rich stories behind the names we have given to our towns, cities, rivers and mountains of New Zealand and celebrates the launch of the new revised edition of A.W. Reed’s 'Place Names of New Zealand,' edited by Peter Dowling and published by Penguin.

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Colin McCahon: The Titirangi Years 1953-1959

The Titirangi years are rightly regarded as the watershed of New Zealand’s most significant artist Colin McCahon (1919-87). At first he focussed on rendering the new landscape of hill, bush and bay he discovered in Titirangi, but later, especially after a career-changing trip to the United States in 1958, his work changed radically again, towards abstract imagery, religious themes, innovative use of text and number, and dramatic changes in scale and medium.

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Under: Curated by Karl Chitham

Surrounded by verdant native bush, Lopdell House is the perfect venue for an exhibition, which investigates the dichotomies of New Zealand landscape. Under is a probing of the way we navigate territories.

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Martin Basher: High Class Boner Meds/Paradise Sale

Martin Basher’s exhibition uses iconic everyday images and objects to ask questions about what our consumer society wants and believes in. His work features exquisite photorealist paintings of beaches and hands, collages, cryptic placards and signs, and sculptural assemblages featuring a variety of consumer goods and fluorescent lights.

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Don Binney: Drawing the West Coast

Compiled by celebrated artist Don Binney, this beautiful little hardback book combines Binney’s delicate coloured pencil drawings of the stunning Waitakere coast, with text that takes the reader on a fascinating journey of the area.

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Joanna Margaret Paul: Subjects to Hand

When Joanna Margaret Paul passed in 2003 she had been working for nearly four decades as an artist and poet. While highly respected in both spheres, she had limited exposure to a national audience. When the many hundreds of drawings left in her Wanganui studio (most of which had never been exhibited) came to light, it was clear that the practice of drawing was central to her art: as was the fact that the drawings constitute an exceptional body of work that demands to be more widely known.

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Lisa Reihana: Nga Hau e Wha

McCahon residency artist, Lisa Reihana presents Nga Hau e Wha, a series of evocative photographs that describe geographic locations, speak of familial connections and re-imagine Maori portraiture.

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Pat Hanly: BLAST!

A generation ago in 1987, New Zealand passed legislation to make the country nuclear free. To celebrate this wonderful achievement writer, Trish Gribben and Lopdell House Gallery are publishing a children’s book featuring Pat Hanly’s anti-nuclear paintings and Gil Hanly’s documentary photographs.

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Judy Millar: Keeping You, You, Keeping Me, Me

Keeping You, You, Keeping Me, Me is Judy Millar's exciting response to her recent experience as the inaugural McCahon House residency artist, living and working in the new studio built next to McCahon House in French Bay, Titirangi.

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John Madden: Silent Resonance of a Turbulent Coastline

Karekare is one of those magical places with the uncanny ability to capture your imagination, your spirit, and your breath. Anyone who has spent time wandering along the wild west beaches between the pounding breakers and the rugged Waitakere Ranges will be familiar with the sense of power and awe this coastline exudes. One man knows that feeling and place more than most.

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Adrian Jackman: Mind the Gap

The gap between a railway station platform and the train's boarding step is a dangerous space, as Adrian Jackman observes from his studio window which takes in a suburban Auckland train station. Gaps have at one time or another invoked fear in most of us, whether it be cracks in the pavement, the gaps between domestic decking floorboards, and even the gaps a painter must negotiate in constructing a composition.

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Roger Donaldson: ALL DOGS SHOT

Best known for the making of landmark movies including Sleeping Dogs, Smash Palace and The World’s Fastest Indian, Roger Donaldson has always armed himself with a camera. ALL DOGS SHOT, presents Donaldson’s first public exhibition of photographs - a stunning collection of black and white photographs shot in New Zealand and around the world.

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Len Castle: Mountain to the Sea

Mountain to the Sea is a celebration of the inspiration that many aspects of New Zealand’s landscape have been for renowned New Zealand ceramic artist Len Castle. The exhibition contains approximately sixty works from the Volcanic and Sea Secrets series that Castle has been developing since the 1990s, alongside photographic images of the landscape, and poetry by ten leading New Zealand poets.

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POST Stitch: Contemporary Stitched Work

POST Stitch is a nation-wide textile exhibition, initiated by Lopdell House Gallery involving over 250 textile and letter enthusiasts of all ages from across the country. The exhibition brings together words, letters, stitching, fabric and paper in a colourful collection of 358 postcard size pieces and 26 large quilt size works from some of New Zealand’s best contemporary textile artists.

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Boundless Books: Steiner Press Books 1992-2008

Elizabeth Steiner has made the specialist subject of bookmaking into a fine art. With precise attention to detail, playful inventiveness and a well honed sense of colour and composition, Elizabeth has crafted a beautiful collection of books over the 17 years that she has been practising the craft.

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Gavin Hipkins: Second Empire

The McCahon residency programme links a new generation of artists with Colin McCahon’s 1950s era. Current residency artist, photographer Gavin Hipkins, is quite literally bringing the past and present together in his recent series of superimposed images – Second Empire.

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Wild Creations

The exhibition brings together a wide variety of artistic styles and mediums from a strong collection of artists all passionate about the wilder places in New Zealand. Each artist has responded to their chosen location - its physical scale, its challenges, its many layered histories and the sense of isolation - in their own unique way.

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In Good Form: The Abstract Art of Roy Good

Roy Good’s paintings are, without exception, instances of modernist abstraction. They are consistently inventive deployments of the ‘building blocks’ of painting – shape, colour, line, space. This survey exhibition, spanning the years from 1968 – 2007, reveals the level of invention and aesthetic and painterly thinking embodied by Good’s paintings.

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Stanley Palmer: To the Harbour

Highly revered painter and printmaker, Stanley Palmer, has produced a stunning collection of monoprints based on his childhood recollections of the Manukau Harbour. Capturing the time and place with his evocative story and illustrations, the resulting beautifully crafted book is part children’s book – part memoir.

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Ngaarara o te Wao: Toi Taiao Whakatairanga

We invite you to hear from Toi Taiao Whakatairanga’s commissioned artists about their projects and process, and to participate in discussion about the wider potential for the arts and creative practices to respond to diverse ecological threats faced by species and ecosystems in Aotearoa and across the world.

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Portage Ceramic Awards 2011

This year the renowned master potter Len Castle passed away, whose extraordinary achievements  remain an inspiration to all artists and potters across the country. The 2010 awards are judged by Janet Mansfield, potter and publisher of high repute and great experience. She has exhibited widely and is represented in most major public collections in Australia and internationally.

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A global history of object design with Michael Smythe

Join Michael Smythe for an in-depth series of talks spread over four Sundays in September that will unpack global object history.

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Portage Ceramic Awards 2015

The Portage Ceramic Awards exhibition is an annual showcase for the diversity of ceramic artists throughout New Zealand. Established in 2001, the awards are the country’s best-known barometer for developments in the field of ceramics.

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Ryan Ballinger: Road Runner

This project comes at a unique time in the history of the gallery, as it transitions from its off-site location in New Lynn back into a purpose-built venue in Titirangi. Ryan Ballinger’s performance will symbolically herald this return.

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Jos Wheeler: Voicing Dissent

Jos Wheeler’s photographs challenge the images employed by the mainstream media. Because photographs can become iconic in defining major events and how we remember them, it’s important to understand which side of the story these images represent.

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The Kauri Project: Poster Series

In collaboration with the Kauri Dieback Management Programme, this exhibition of limited edition prints and city-wide poster campaign links five artists with researchers and iwi that uses art as a tool for activism and education.

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Jay Hollows: The Grain of the Sound and the Thing in Your Hand

An investigation into the thingness, or object-status of the vinyl record. The recording plays all of the records with the music taken out, leaving just the moment between tracks to emphasise the clicks, pops and crackle that are unique to each record, accumulated through their use.

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Andrea du Chatenier: The Cell and the Bride

The drapes of du Chatenier’s world have been lifted and the scene displayed in the gallery window is an artist’s cell. As a self-contained world of creative endeavor the window may either be likened to a hermit’s cave or a prison.

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Delicia Sampero: Conference of the Birds

A new species of bird has been discovered inhabiting Lopdell House, perching on the roof of the newly redeveloped building. Roughly the same size as a human their colouration ranges from yellow to orange and responds to light, reflecting the passing glow of headlights.

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Veronica Herber: Site Unseen

The distinctive 1960s architecture of Ceramco House will be the canvas for award-winning artist Veronica Herber’s cascade of colour, which will flow around to our adjacent gallery.

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Weilun Ha: Gods of the Forest

An 'East meets Westie' encounter as the Window Project Space is transformed into an architectural ‘bush walk’ that unites traditional Asian ink landscape techniques with the flora and fauna of the Waitakeres, focusing on the iconic kauri tree. Eleven percent of kauri trees in the Waitakere Ranges have already been wiped out by the kauri dieback disease, and with government funding now under threat, the kauri could be extinct within decades. Weilun Ha's message promotes advocacy for this mighty tree.

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Matariki 2013: Whetu, Whenu, Whenua

An exhibition acknowledging the threads that connect us as a community, the community to the land, and the traditional to the contemporary. It is a celebration of the art of mahi raranga (weaving activities), whatu (fibre weaving) and tukutuku (wall panel lattice work).

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Denise Bachelor: Silent Wings

These are works of contemplation that offer the viewer access to an interstitial realm between movement and stillness. Batchelor’s practice revisits the historical sublime with a contemporary rewrite; the once expanse has turned inward, revealing an inexplicability caught within the smallest detail.

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Mannequin March

A marketable endeavor as well as an art form, the mannequin has created an ambiguous connection between art and commercialism. On 6 April at 6pm, the fantastic array of Mannequin March creations go under the hammer for charity.

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Toitu te Ngahere: Art in schools for forest health

This exhibition features work created by students from two local schools as part of a collaborative research project in partnership with the University of Auckland | Waipapa Taumata Rau. Combining science, mātauranga Māori and the arts, students explore ways to contribute to ngahere ora as kaitiaki in response to kauri dieback and myrtle rust.

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Hulita Koloi: Malaloi

Malaloi—presented in Te Uru's window space—speaks directly to the urban environment, comprising a scaffold structure upon which concrete-dipped garments donated by Koloi's family and her wider Pacific community are hung. It addresses the separation of people from the land, the effects of industrialisation and capitalism within Pacific communities, and the shared responsibility of humanity, past, present and future, to tread lightly on the earth.

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Opening event: Tia Ranginui and Robert Leonard on Gonville gothic

Please join us to celebrate the opening of Gonville gothic on Saturday 10 September. Artist Tia Ranginui (Ngāti Hine Oneone) and curator Robert Leonard will give a floor talk at 2pm, responding to the bodies of work included in the show and the artist's reimagining of patupaiarehe as suburban layabouts, touching on local histories of the patupaiarehe who were known to dwell in the Waitākere Ranges.

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Te Uru 2022 AGM

An opportunity for members of Te Uru Waitākere Contemporary Gallery Incorporated to hear about the gallery’s progress and plans for the future.

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Artist talk: Emily Karaka with Paul Majurey and Te Warena Taua

Please join us for a free afternoon talk with artist Emily Karaka, in conversation with Paul Majurey, the Chair of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority (2014-present), and Te Wārena Taua, an original board member of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority. This discussion will respond to Karaka's exhibition Matariki Ring of Fire which centers on the Matariki star cluster and the fourteen Tūpuna Maunga of the Tāmaki Makaurau region.

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SCREENING: NOSFERATU, WITH A LIVE RE-SCORE BY DARRYN HARKNESS

Te Uru presents a special Halloween screening of F. W. Murnau's Nosferatu (1922), celebrating the 100th anniversary of the horror classic with a live re-score by Tamaki Makarau-based musician, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist, Darryn Harkness.

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/drive-thru, play-thru/ -- an online conversation with Danielle Brathwaite-Shirley and Ary Jansen moderated by Tendai Mutambu

CIRCUIT and Te Uru present /drive-thru, play-thru/ — an online screening and Zoom conversation with artists Danielle Brathwaite-Shirley (UK) and Ary Jansen (NZ), moderated by Tendai Mutambu.

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Elizabeth Thomson: Cellular memory

Elizabeth Thomson's practice engages with science, imagination, culture, and fundamental questions about humanity’s place in nature and what citizenship means within this expanded realm. Cellular memory surveys these enquiries, attesting to Thomson’s life-long commitment to grappling with natural and human histories, as well as the lasting influence of her childhood in Titirangi.

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Te aho tapu hou: The new sacred thread

This mid-career retrospective brings together garments created by designer and fashion activist Jeanine Clarkin. Spanning her thirty-year career, the exhibition explores Clarkin’s early influences, significant milestones, and enduring passion for sustainability, with her Māori identity a common thread through it all.

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Opening event: Elizabeth Thomson and Gregory O'Brien on Cellular memory

Please join us to celebrate the opening of Cellular memory on Saturday 24 September. Artist Elizabeth Thomson and exhibition curator Gregory O'Bien will give a floor talk at 2pm, taking a closer look at the concept of 'cellular memory' that has guided this presentation from its conception and around the country on its national tour.

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Opening event: Jeanine Clarkin in conversation with Giles Peterson

Join exhibiting artist, Jeanine Clarkin, and Giles Peterson in conversation, surveying Clarkin's thirty-year career in fashion design and fashion activism to mark the opening of Te aho tapu hou: The new sacred thread at Te Uru.

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Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

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Jeanine Clarkin’s photo DJ party

Nau mai, haere mai, come one and all for a fashion photo shoot and party with DJ Tuāfale and Jeanine Clarkin as part of the exhibition Te aho tapu hou: The new sacred thread.

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Tia Ranginui: Gonville gothic

Sometimes described as Māori fairy folk, patupaiarehe were said to live in the mountains and forests, cleaving to darkness, and building their homes from swirling mists. They had pale skin and red or fair hair, and bewitched people, especially young women, luring them away. Redhead and albino Māori were sometimes said to be the result of interbreeding. Today, some speculate that patupaiarehe descended from early Europeans who arrived here before Polynesians.

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Portage 22 - Judge's tour and events

This summer Te Uru has on show a suite of clay-based exhibitions including, opening on this day, the Portage Ceramic Awards 22, our annual showcase of contemporary ceramics; also newly opened, Earth posters, a collaboration between artist Fiona Jack and writer Courtney Sina Meredith; and Onewherowhero, featuring work by Kelston Intermediate students, coordinated by artist Carla Ruka and supported by the Ministry of Education’s Creatives in Schools programme.

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Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

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Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

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Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

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Janet lilo: FREE Public Programmes

Be part of an exciting Janet Lilo installation in the Learning Centre Gallery in June and July - help create amazing 3D objects in paper mache. This will be messy so please wear suitable clothing. Suitable for children aged 6 and up accompanied by an adult.

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From Scratch: Heart’Heart Performances From Scratch:

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Touch tour & audio introduction of From Scratch: 546 Moons / Heart’Heart

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From Scratch: Screenings and playspace sessions From Scratch:

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Sonicsfromscratch Live

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Screening - Philip Dadson:
Sonics from Scratch

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Blood & Bone and Splash publication launch

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The Thrum of The Tide: Performance

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New Moon Folk Ball

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Autumn open day

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Gallery concert: Kingsley Spargo

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Winter open day

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Jewellery workshop with Lisa Walker

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Inspire Series: June

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Painting Workshop with Pusi Urale

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Open Studio With Pusi Urale

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Netsuke Exhibition talk: Grace Lai, Human History Curator at Auckland Museum

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Film screening: Every Day a Good Day

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Philippa Blair: A Conversation

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Philippa Blair Workshop

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Clay Workshop With Wi Tapera

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Nuku Floor Talk

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Drop the Ball:
Live Performance and Open StudioDrop the Ball:

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Panel Discussion:
Performing CollaborationPanel Discussion:

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Ecowest 2019: Lungsong

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‘A way through’: Curators’ talk

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Going West - Peter Simpson: The Art of Writing for Art

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Signs and Symbols to live by? — Colin McCahon, Gate III and contemporary practice

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Musings on McCahon

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Wystan Curnow talk:

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Finn McCahon-Jones: Walking with McCahon

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Caroline Thomas: Worth

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HANDSHAKE 5: Artists' Walk & Talk

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HANDSHAKE 5: Critical Writing Workshop

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Bauhaus Beauty: Pocket Histories Talk with Linda Tyler

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Kerry ann lee: open studio

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Paper, Clay and Wood: Artist Talks and WorkshopsPaper

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from the shore: screening programme

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HEAT: performance programme

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HEAT: Nina Czegledy SPEAKS on ecological art activism

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Flotilla Whau

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HEAT: Solar Revolutions – Pitopito kōrero

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Curator tour: Picturing Asia with Ian Wedde

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The Fairy Falls: Screening, artist talk and Book launch

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Raise the Umbrellas: SPECIAL PREVIEW

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FILM SCREENING: SEVEN SAMURAI

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The Exquisite Wound: collaborator’s conversation

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The Exquisite Wound: artist talk

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Yukihiro Taguchi: at Avondale Markets

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Walking Clay Tour

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SQUIGGLA: Free Family Event

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Curator Gallery Tour: Roger Ballen's Theatre of the Mind

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The Asia Pacific Century:Talkfest

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Max Harris: close reading of The New Zealand Project

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Rita Angus: New Zealand Modernist | He Ringatoi Hou o Aotearoa

Te Papa touring exhibition Rita Angus: New Zealand Modernist | He Ringatoi Hou o Aotearoa brings together 20 works by one of New Zealand’s most iconic 20th-century artists, Rita Angus (1908–1970). She was fundamental to the establishment of a distinctive, modern school of art in New Zealand. Over a period of 40 years, Angus produced a remarkable body of work.

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Portage Events

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Portage Ceramic Awards: Past Winners

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Mannequin March 2014

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Katharina Kercher: Mannequin

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Portage Ceramic Events

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Artist Talk: Christine Hellyar

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Botanical Drawing With
Christine Hellyar

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Artist Talk: Sarah Smuts-Kennedy

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Takeshi Yasuda: Pottery Demonstration

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MOYRA ELLIOTt: THE LEADING LADIES

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Leading Ladies: Wikipedia Edit-a-thon

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Judge’s Tour with Takeshi Yasuda

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The Burning Hours: Floortalk with Balamohan SHINGADEThe Burning Hours:

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Clay O’Clock: An Auckland Festival of Ceramics

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Indian Music Concert

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Kathy barry'S homeworld

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A Study of a Samoan Savage - 
a presentation by Yuki KiharaA Study of a Samoan Savage - 

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Tiffany Singh ARTIST TALK

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A Study of a Samoan Savage -  Film screening  

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Yuki Kihara: Them and Us

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DAN ARPS in conversation with 

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Black Rainbow Events

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uniform: exchange/no venues 

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Jae Kang: FREE Public Programmes

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Screen-printing workshop

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Five By Five: Curator Talk

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SUPERFLEX: Copy Light Factory  

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ON REPEAT: PANEL DISCUSSION

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Nathan Haines And The Art Ensemble Perform Quartet

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JOHN PARKER: ARTIST TALK

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Anne McCahon: Gallery Tour

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The Shadbolt And Harvey Show

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Rosemary Mcleod: Gallery Talk

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Talking and Walking the Brain

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Going West

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Indie Book Fair

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Artweek

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Richard Stratton: Artist Talk

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White Night: Basant Madhur and the Sargam School of Music

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Brian Brake: Lens On Asia, gallery Lecture by Athol McCredie

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Rodney Charters and Gary Baigent in conversation with Ian Wedde

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About walking

About walking is a series of performative and participatory walks that travel across Auckland with Te Hau ā Uru – the West Wind. The walks are artworks – guided experiences leading audiences and participants across Auckland – created by twelve artists and one writer.

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About walking: Richard Orjis: cruising, lazing, leaning

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About walking: Jeremy Leatinu’u: Mauria

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Pīta Turei: Mata Kē Ao

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About walking - Christina Houghton Wayfinding Waikumete: walking glen eden

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Walking About: Rangi Matariki by Pīta Turei

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About Walking: Jeremy Leatinu’u, Kawea

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About walking: The Public Stand: Becca Wood

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Walking about in fog by Layne Waerea and Lana Lopesi

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Melissa Laing: Standing at the edge

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About Walking - Echo Eco Echo: Andrew McMillan

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The Hauntology of Inheritance: Suzanne Cowan and Rodney Bell

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val smith: queer walk-nap

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Walking about: Christina Houghton, Wayfinding Waikumete

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BLOOD WATER EARTH Performances

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Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

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Onewherowhero

Students from Kelston Intermediate explore connection to whenua and rangatiratanga through making with uku (clay), a medium with a long history of use in the Kelston area. In this collaborative exhibition, they present a collection of hand-coiled kaitiaki forms, and sculpted pūtangitangi (flute) instruments.  This project has been supported by leading ceramic artist Carla Ruka through the Ministry of Education’s Creatives in Schools programme.

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Artist talk: Fiona Jack and Courtney Sina Meredith

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De la Milpa a la Mesa

De la Milpa a la Mesa takes visitors on a journey of discovery to a country of incredible cultural and ecological diversity, whose agriculture and cuisine are treasured World Heritage. From the farm to the market to the table, food has been the heart and soul of Mexican life for millennia.

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Rita Angus exhibition tour

Join Lizzie Bisley, Te Papa’s Curator Modern Art, and Andrew Clifford, Te Uru’s Director, for a tour of the exhibition, Rita Angus: New Zealand Modernist | He Ringatoi Hou o Aotearoa, followed by refreshments for the exhibition’s opening.

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