February 2023

MO
TU
WE
TH
FR
SA
SU
30
31
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
1
2
3
4
5
EXHIBITIONS ON Monday 30 January
Start from: October 1, 2022 - 8:00 am
End at: February 12, 2023 - 6:00 pm

OnewherowheroOngoing

Start from: November 26, 2022 - 8:00 am
End at: March 5, 2023 - 6:00 pm

Portage 22Ongoing

EXHIBITIONS ON Tuesday 31 January
Start from: October 1, 2022 - 8:00 am
End at: February 12, 2023 - 6:00 pm

OnewherowheroOngoing

Start from: November 26, 2022 - 8:00 am
End at: March 5, 2023 - 6:00 pm

Portage 22Ongoing

EXHIBITIONS ON Wednesday 01 February
Tia Ranginui: Gonville gothic

Sometimes described as Māori fairy folk, patupaiarehe were said to live in the mountains and forests, cleaving to darkness, and building their homes from swirling mists. They had pale skin and red or fair hair, and bewitched people, especially young women, luring them away. Redhead and albino Māori were sometimes said to be the result of interbreeding. Today, some speculate that patupaiarehe descended from early Europeans who arrived here before Polynesians.

10 September - 26 February  |  See event detail
Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

10 December - 28 May  |  See event detail
Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

10 December - 12 March  |  See event detail
Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

10 December - 02 July  |  See event detail
Onewherowhero

Students from Kelston Intermediate explore connection to whenua and rangatiratanga through making with uku (clay), a medium with a long history of use in the Kelston area. In this collaborative exhibition, they present a collection of hand-coiled kaitiaki forms, and sculpted pūtangitangi (flute) instruments.  This project has been supported by leading ceramic artist Carla Ruka through the Ministry of Education’s Creatives in Schools programme.

01 October - 12 February  |  See event detail
Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
EXHIBITIONS ON Thursday 02 February
Tia Ranginui: Gonville gothic

Sometimes described as Māori fairy folk, patupaiarehe were said to live in the mountains and forests, cleaving to darkness, and building their homes from swirling mists. They had pale skin and red or fair hair, and bewitched people, especially young women, luring them away. Redhead and albino Māori were sometimes said to be the result of interbreeding. Today, some speculate that patupaiarehe descended from early Europeans who arrived here before Polynesians.

10 September - 26 February  |  See event detail
Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

10 December - 28 May  |  See event detail
Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

10 December - 12 March  |  See event detail
Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

10 December - 02 July  |  See event detail
Onewherowhero

Students from Kelston Intermediate explore connection to whenua and rangatiratanga through making with uku (clay), a medium with a long history of use in the Kelston area. In this collaborative exhibition, they present a collection of hand-coiled kaitiaki forms, and sculpted pūtangitangi (flute) instruments.  This project has been supported by leading ceramic artist Carla Ruka through the Ministry of Education’s Creatives in Schools programme.

01 October - 12 February  |  See event detail
Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
EXHIBITIONS ON Friday 03 February
Tia Ranginui: Gonville gothic

Sometimes described as Māori fairy folk, patupaiarehe were said to live in the mountains and forests, cleaving to darkness, and building their homes from swirling mists. They had pale skin and red or fair hair, and bewitched people, especially young women, luring them away. Redhead and albino Māori were sometimes said to be the result of interbreeding. Today, some speculate that patupaiarehe descended from early Europeans who arrived here before Polynesians.

10 September - 26 February  |  See event detail
Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

10 December - 28 May  |  See event detail
Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

10 December - 12 March  |  See event detail
Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

10 December - 02 July  |  See event detail
Onewherowhero

Students from Kelston Intermediate explore connection to whenua and rangatiratanga through making with uku (clay), a medium with a long history of use in the Kelston area. In this collaborative exhibition, they present a collection of hand-coiled kaitiaki forms, and sculpted pūtangitangi (flute) instruments.  This project has been supported by leading ceramic artist Carla Ruka through the Ministry of Education’s Creatives in Schools programme.

01 October - 12 February  |  See event detail
Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
EXHIBITIONS ON Saturday 04 February
Tia Ranginui: Gonville gothic

Sometimes described as Māori fairy folk, patupaiarehe were said to live in the mountains and forests, cleaving to darkness, and building their homes from swirling mists. They had pale skin and red or fair hair, and bewitched people, especially young women, luring them away. Redhead and albino Māori were sometimes said to be the result of interbreeding. Today, some speculate that patupaiarehe descended from early Europeans who arrived here before Polynesians.

10 September - 26 February  |  See event detail
Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

10 December - 28 May  |  See event detail
Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

10 December - 12 March  |  See event detail
Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

10 December - 02 July  |  See event detail
Onewherowhero

Students from Kelston Intermediate explore connection to whenua and rangatiratanga through making with uku (clay), a medium with a long history of use in the Kelston area. In this collaborative exhibition, they present a collection of hand-coiled kaitiaki forms, and sculpted pūtangitangi (flute) instruments.  This project has been supported by leading ceramic artist Carla Ruka through the Ministry of Education’s Creatives in Schools programme.

01 October - 12 February  |  See event detail
Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
EXHIBITIONS ON Sunday 05 February
Tia Ranginui: Gonville gothic

Sometimes described as Māori fairy folk, patupaiarehe were said to live in the mountains and forests, cleaving to darkness, and building their homes from swirling mists. They had pale skin and red or fair hair, and bewitched people, especially young women, luring them away. Redhead and albino Māori were sometimes said to be the result of interbreeding. Today, some speculate that patupaiarehe descended from early Europeans who arrived here before Polynesians.

10 September - 26 February  |  See event detail
Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

10 December - 28 May  |  See event detail
Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

10 December - 12 March  |  See event detail
Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

10 December - 02 July  |  See event detail
Onewherowhero

Students from Kelston Intermediate explore connection to whenua and rangatiratanga through making with uku (clay), a medium with a long history of use in the Kelston area. In this collaborative exhibition, they present a collection of hand-coiled kaitiaki forms, and sculpted pūtangitangi (flute) instruments.  This project has been supported by leading ceramic artist Carla Ruka through the Ministry of Education’s Creatives in Schools programme.

01 October - 12 February  |  See event detail
Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
EXHIBITIONS ON Monday 06 February
Tia Ranginui: Gonville gothic

Sometimes described as Māori fairy folk, patupaiarehe were said to live in the mountains and forests, cleaving to darkness, and building their homes from swirling mists. They had pale skin and red or fair hair, and bewitched people, especially young women, luring them away. Redhead and albino Māori were sometimes said to be the result of interbreeding. Today, some speculate that patupaiarehe descended from early Europeans who arrived here before Polynesians.

10 September - 26 February  |  See event detail
Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

10 December - 28 May  |  See event detail
Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

10 December - 12 March  |  See event detail
Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

10 December - 02 July  |  See event detail
Onewherowhero

Students from Kelston Intermediate explore connection to whenua and rangatiratanga through making with uku (clay), a medium with a long history of use in the Kelston area. In this collaborative exhibition, they present a collection of hand-coiled kaitiaki forms, and sculpted pūtangitangi (flute) instruments.  This project has been supported by leading ceramic artist Carla Ruka through the Ministry of Education’s Creatives in Schools programme.

01 October - 12 February  |  See event detail
Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
EXHIBITIONS ON Tuesday 07 February
Tia Ranginui: Gonville gothic

Sometimes described as Māori fairy folk, patupaiarehe were said to live in the mountains and forests, cleaving to darkness, and building their homes from swirling mists. They had pale skin and red or fair hair, and bewitched people, especially young women, luring them away. Redhead and albino Māori were sometimes said to be the result of interbreeding. Today, some speculate that patupaiarehe descended from early Europeans who arrived here before Polynesians.

10 September - 26 February  |  See event detail
Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

10 December - 28 May  |  See event detail
Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

10 December - 12 March  |  See event detail
Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

10 December - 02 July  |  See event detail
Onewherowhero

Students from Kelston Intermediate explore connection to whenua and rangatiratanga through making with uku (clay), a medium with a long history of use in the Kelston area. In this collaborative exhibition, they present a collection of hand-coiled kaitiaki forms, and sculpted pūtangitangi (flute) instruments.  This project has been supported by leading ceramic artist Carla Ruka through the Ministry of Education’s Creatives in Schools programme.

01 October - 12 February  |  See event detail
Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
EXHIBITIONS ON Wednesday 08 February
Tia Ranginui: Gonville gothic

Sometimes described as Māori fairy folk, patupaiarehe were said to live in the mountains and forests, cleaving to darkness, and building their homes from swirling mists. They had pale skin and red or fair hair, and bewitched people, especially young women, luring them away. Redhead and albino Māori were sometimes said to be the result of interbreeding. Today, some speculate that patupaiarehe descended from early Europeans who arrived here before Polynesians.

10 September - 26 February  |  See event detail
Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

10 December - 28 May  |  See event detail
Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

10 December - 12 March  |  See event detail
Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

10 December - 02 July  |  See event detail
Onewherowhero

Students from Kelston Intermediate explore connection to whenua and rangatiratanga through making with uku (clay), a medium with a long history of use in the Kelston area. In this collaborative exhibition, they present a collection of hand-coiled kaitiaki forms, and sculpted pūtangitangi (flute) instruments.  This project has been supported by leading ceramic artist Carla Ruka through the Ministry of Education’s Creatives in Schools programme.

01 October - 12 February  |  See event detail
Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
EXHIBITIONS ON Thursday 09 February
Tia Ranginui: Gonville gothic

Sometimes described as Māori fairy folk, patupaiarehe were said to live in the mountains and forests, cleaving to darkness, and building their homes from swirling mists. They had pale skin and red or fair hair, and bewitched people, especially young women, luring them away. Redhead and albino Māori were sometimes said to be the result of interbreeding. Today, some speculate that patupaiarehe descended from early Europeans who arrived here before Polynesians.

10 September - 26 February  |  See event detail
Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

10 December - 28 May  |  See event detail
Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

10 December - 12 March  |  See event detail
Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

10 December - 02 July  |  See event detail
Onewherowhero

Students from Kelston Intermediate explore connection to whenua and rangatiratanga through making with uku (clay), a medium with a long history of use in the Kelston area. In this collaborative exhibition, they present a collection of hand-coiled kaitiaki forms, and sculpted pūtangitangi (flute) instruments.  This project has been supported by leading ceramic artist Carla Ruka through the Ministry of Education’s Creatives in Schools programme.

01 October - 12 February  |  See event detail
Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
EXHIBITIONS ON Friday 10 February
Tia Ranginui: Gonville gothic

Sometimes described as Māori fairy folk, patupaiarehe were said to live in the mountains and forests, cleaving to darkness, and building their homes from swirling mists. They had pale skin and red or fair hair, and bewitched people, especially young women, luring them away. Redhead and albino Māori were sometimes said to be the result of interbreeding. Today, some speculate that patupaiarehe descended from early Europeans who arrived here before Polynesians.

10 September - 26 February  |  See event detail
Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

10 December - 28 May  |  See event detail
Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

10 December - 12 March  |  See event detail
Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

10 December - 02 July  |  See event detail
Onewherowhero

Students from Kelston Intermediate explore connection to whenua and rangatiratanga through making with uku (clay), a medium with a long history of use in the Kelston area. In this collaborative exhibition, they present a collection of hand-coiled kaitiaki forms, and sculpted pūtangitangi (flute) instruments.  This project has been supported by leading ceramic artist Carla Ruka through the Ministry of Education’s Creatives in Schools programme.

01 October - 12 February  |  See event detail
Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
EXHIBITIONS ON Saturday 11 February
Tia Ranginui: Gonville gothic

Sometimes described as Māori fairy folk, patupaiarehe were said to live in the mountains and forests, cleaving to darkness, and building their homes from swirling mists. They had pale skin and red or fair hair, and bewitched people, especially young women, luring them away. Redhead and albino Māori were sometimes said to be the result of interbreeding. Today, some speculate that patupaiarehe descended from early Europeans who arrived here before Polynesians.

10 September - 26 February  |  See event detail
Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

10 December - 28 May  |  See event detail
Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

10 December - 12 March  |  See event detail
Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

10 December - 02 July  |  See event detail
Onewherowhero

Students from Kelston Intermediate explore connection to whenua and rangatiratanga through making with uku (clay), a medium with a long history of use in the Kelston area. In this collaborative exhibition, they present a collection of hand-coiled kaitiaki forms, and sculpted pūtangitangi (flute) instruments.  This project has been supported by leading ceramic artist Carla Ruka through the Ministry of Education’s Creatives in Schools programme.

01 October - 12 February  |  See event detail
Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
EXHIBITIONS ON Sunday 12 February
Tia Ranginui: Gonville gothic

Sometimes described as Māori fairy folk, patupaiarehe were said to live in the mountains and forests, cleaving to darkness, and building their homes from swirling mists. They had pale skin and red or fair hair, and bewitched people, especially young women, luring them away. Redhead and albino Māori were sometimes said to be the result of interbreeding. Today, some speculate that patupaiarehe descended from early Europeans who arrived here before Polynesians.

10 September - 26 February  |  See event detail
Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

10 December - 28 May  |  See event detail
Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

10 December - 12 March  |  See event detail
Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

10 December - 02 July  |  See event detail
Onewherowhero

Students from Kelston Intermediate explore connection to whenua and rangatiratanga through making with uku (clay), a medium with a long history of use in the Kelston area. In this collaborative exhibition, they present a collection of hand-coiled kaitiaki forms, and sculpted pūtangitangi (flute) instruments.  This project has been supported by leading ceramic artist Carla Ruka through the Ministry of Education’s Creatives in Schools programme.

01 October - 12 February  |  See event detail
Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
EXHIBITIONS ON Monday 13 February
Tia Ranginui: Gonville gothic

Sometimes described as Māori fairy folk, patupaiarehe were said to live in the mountains and forests, cleaving to darkness, and building their homes from swirling mists. They had pale skin and red or fair hair, and bewitched people, especially young women, luring them away. Redhead and albino Māori were sometimes said to be the result of interbreeding. Today, some speculate that patupaiarehe descended from early Europeans who arrived here before Polynesians.

10 September - 26 February  |  See event detail
Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

10 December - 28 May  |  See event detail
Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

10 December - 12 March  |  See event detail
Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

10 December - 02 July  |  See event detail
Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
EXHIBITIONS ON Tuesday 14 February
Tia Ranginui: Gonville gothic

Sometimes described as Māori fairy folk, patupaiarehe were said to live in the mountains and forests, cleaving to darkness, and building their homes from swirling mists. They had pale skin and red or fair hair, and bewitched people, especially young women, luring them away. Redhead and albino Māori were sometimes said to be the result of interbreeding. Today, some speculate that patupaiarehe descended from early Europeans who arrived here before Polynesians.

10 September - 26 February  |  See event detail
Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

10 December - 28 May  |  See event detail
Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

10 December - 12 March  |  See event detail
Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

10 December - 02 July  |  See event detail
Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
EXHIBITIONS ON Wednesday 15 February
Tia Ranginui: Gonville gothic

Sometimes described as Māori fairy folk, patupaiarehe were said to live in the mountains and forests, cleaving to darkness, and building their homes from swirling mists. They had pale skin and red or fair hair, and bewitched people, especially young women, luring them away. Redhead and albino Māori were sometimes said to be the result of interbreeding. Today, some speculate that patupaiarehe descended from early Europeans who arrived here before Polynesians.

10 September - 26 February  |  See event detail
Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

10 December - 28 May  |  See event detail
Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

10 December - 12 March  |  See event detail
Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

10 December - 02 July  |  See event detail
Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
EXHIBITIONS ON Thursday 16 February
Tia Ranginui: Gonville gothic

Sometimes described as Māori fairy folk, patupaiarehe were said to live in the mountains and forests, cleaving to darkness, and building their homes from swirling mists. They had pale skin and red or fair hair, and bewitched people, especially young women, luring them away. Redhead and albino Māori were sometimes said to be the result of interbreeding. Today, some speculate that patupaiarehe descended from early Europeans who arrived here before Polynesians.

10 September - 26 February  |  See event detail
Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

10 December - 28 May  |  See event detail
Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

10 December - 12 March  |  See event detail
Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

10 December - 02 July  |  See event detail
Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
EXHIBITIONS ON Friday 17 February
Tia Ranginui: Gonville gothic

Sometimes described as Māori fairy folk, patupaiarehe were said to live in the mountains and forests, cleaving to darkness, and building their homes from swirling mists. They had pale skin and red or fair hair, and bewitched people, especially young women, luring them away. Redhead and albino Māori were sometimes said to be the result of interbreeding. Today, some speculate that patupaiarehe descended from early Europeans who arrived here before Polynesians.

10 September - 26 February  |  See event detail
Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

10 December - 28 May  |  See event detail
Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

10 December - 12 March  |  See event detail
Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

10 December - 02 July  |  See event detail
Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
EXHIBITIONS ON Saturday 18 February
Tia Ranginui: Gonville gothic

Sometimes described as Māori fairy folk, patupaiarehe were said to live in the mountains and forests, cleaving to darkness, and building their homes from swirling mists. They had pale skin and red or fair hair, and bewitched people, especially young women, luring them away. Redhead and albino Māori were sometimes said to be the result of interbreeding. Today, some speculate that patupaiarehe descended from early Europeans who arrived here before Polynesians.

10 September - 26 February  |  See event detail
Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

10 December - 28 May  |  See event detail
Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

10 December - 12 March  |  See event detail
Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

10 December - 02 July  |  See event detail
De la Milpa a la Mesa

De la Milpa a la Mesa takes visitors on a journey of discovery to a country of incredible cultural and ecological diversity, whose agriculture and cuisine are treasured World Heritage. From the farm to the market to the table, food has been the heart and soul of Mexican life for millennia.

18 February - 07 March  |  See event detail
Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
EXHIBITIONS ON Sunday 19 February
Tia Ranginui: Gonville gothic

Sometimes described as Māori fairy folk, patupaiarehe were said to live in the mountains and forests, cleaving to darkness, and building their homes from swirling mists. They had pale skin and red or fair hair, and bewitched people, especially young women, luring them away. Redhead and albino Māori were sometimes said to be the result of interbreeding. Today, some speculate that patupaiarehe descended from early Europeans who arrived here before Polynesians.

10 September - 26 February  |  See event detail
Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

10 December - 28 May  |  See event detail
Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

10 December - 12 March  |  See event detail
Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

10 December - 02 July  |  See event detail
De la Milpa a la Mesa

De la Milpa a la Mesa takes visitors on a journey of discovery to a country of incredible cultural and ecological diversity, whose agriculture and cuisine are treasured World Heritage. From the farm to the market to the table, food has been the heart and soul of Mexican life for millennia.

18 February - 07 March  |  See event detail
Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
EXHIBITIONS ON Monday 20 February
Tia Ranginui: Gonville gothic

Sometimes described as Māori fairy folk, patupaiarehe were said to live in the mountains and forests, cleaving to darkness, and building their homes from swirling mists. They had pale skin and red or fair hair, and bewitched people, especially young women, luring them away. Redhead and albino Māori were sometimes said to be the result of interbreeding. Today, some speculate that patupaiarehe descended from early Europeans who arrived here before Polynesians.

10 September - 26 February  |  See event detail
Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

10 December - 28 May  |  See event detail
Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

10 December - 12 March  |  See event detail
Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

10 December - 02 July  |  See event detail
De la Milpa a la Mesa

De la Milpa a la Mesa takes visitors on a journey of discovery to a country of incredible cultural and ecological diversity, whose agriculture and cuisine are treasured World Heritage. From the farm to the market to the table, food has been the heart and soul of Mexican life for millennia.

18 February - 07 March  |  See event detail
Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
EXHIBITIONS ON Tuesday 21 February
Tia Ranginui: Gonville gothic

Sometimes described as Māori fairy folk, patupaiarehe were said to live in the mountains and forests, cleaving to darkness, and building their homes from swirling mists. They had pale skin and red or fair hair, and bewitched people, especially young women, luring them away. Redhead and albino Māori were sometimes said to be the result of interbreeding. Today, some speculate that patupaiarehe descended from early Europeans who arrived here before Polynesians.

10 September - 26 February  |  See event detail
Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

10 December - 28 May  |  See event detail
Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

10 December - 12 March  |  See event detail
Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

10 December - 02 July  |  See event detail
De la Milpa a la Mesa

De la Milpa a la Mesa takes visitors on a journey of discovery to a country of incredible cultural and ecological diversity, whose agriculture and cuisine are treasured World Heritage. From the farm to the market to the table, food has been the heart and soul of Mexican life for millennia.

18 February - 07 March  |  See event detail
Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
EXHIBITIONS ON Wednesday 22 February
Tia Ranginui: Gonville gothic

Sometimes described as Māori fairy folk, patupaiarehe were said to live in the mountains and forests, cleaving to darkness, and building their homes from swirling mists. They had pale skin and red or fair hair, and bewitched people, especially young women, luring them away. Redhead and albino Māori were sometimes said to be the result of interbreeding. Today, some speculate that patupaiarehe descended from early Europeans who arrived here before Polynesians.

10 September - 26 February  |  See event detail
Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

10 December - 28 May  |  See event detail
Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

10 December - 12 March  |  See event detail
Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

10 December - 02 July  |  See event detail
De la Milpa a la Mesa

De la Milpa a la Mesa takes visitors on a journey of discovery to a country of incredible cultural and ecological diversity, whose agriculture and cuisine are treasured World Heritage. From the farm to the market to the table, food has been the heart and soul of Mexican life for millennia.

18 February - 07 March  |  See event detail
Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
EXHIBITIONS ON Thursday 23 February
Tia Ranginui: Gonville gothic

Sometimes described as Māori fairy folk, patupaiarehe were said to live in the mountains and forests, cleaving to darkness, and building their homes from swirling mists. They had pale skin and red or fair hair, and bewitched people, especially young women, luring them away. Redhead and albino Māori were sometimes said to be the result of interbreeding. Today, some speculate that patupaiarehe descended from early Europeans who arrived here before Polynesians.

10 September - 26 February  |  See event detail
Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

10 December - 28 May  |  See event detail
Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

10 December - 12 March  |  See event detail
Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

10 December - 02 July  |  See event detail
De la Milpa a la Mesa

De la Milpa a la Mesa takes visitors on a journey of discovery to a country of incredible cultural and ecological diversity, whose agriculture and cuisine are treasured World Heritage. From the farm to the market to the table, food has been the heart and soul of Mexican life for millennia.

18 February - 07 March  |  See event detail
Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
EXHIBITIONS ON Friday 24 February
Tia Ranginui: Gonville gothic

Sometimes described as Māori fairy folk, patupaiarehe were said to live in the mountains and forests, cleaving to darkness, and building their homes from swirling mists. They had pale skin and red or fair hair, and bewitched people, especially young women, luring them away. Redhead and albino Māori were sometimes said to be the result of interbreeding. Today, some speculate that patupaiarehe descended from early Europeans who arrived here before Polynesians.

10 September - 26 February  |  See event detail
Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

10 December - 28 May  |  See event detail
Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

10 December - 12 March  |  See event detail
Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

10 December - 02 July  |  See event detail
De la Milpa a la Mesa

De la Milpa a la Mesa takes visitors on a journey of discovery to a country of incredible cultural and ecological diversity, whose agriculture and cuisine are treasured World Heritage. From the farm to the market to the table, food has been the heart and soul of Mexican life for millennia.

18 February - 07 March  |  See event detail
Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
EXHIBITIONS ON Saturday 25 February
Tia Ranginui: Gonville gothic

Sometimes described as Māori fairy folk, patupaiarehe were said to live in the mountains and forests, cleaving to darkness, and building their homes from swirling mists. They had pale skin and red or fair hair, and bewitched people, especially young women, luring them away. Redhead and albino Māori were sometimes said to be the result of interbreeding. Today, some speculate that patupaiarehe descended from early Europeans who arrived here before Polynesians.

10 September - 26 February  |  See event detail
Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

10 December - 28 May  |  See event detail
Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

10 December - 12 March  |  See event detail
Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

10 December - 02 July  |  See event detail
De la Milpa a la Mesa

De la Milpa a la Mesa takes visitors on a journey of discovery to a country of incredible cultural and ecological diversity, whose agriculture and cuisine are treasured World Heritage. From the farm to the market to the table, food has been the heart and soul of Mexican life for millennia.

18 February - 07 March  |  See event detail
Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
EXHIBITIONS ON Sunday 26 February
Tia Ranginui: Gonville gothic

Sometimes described as Māori fairy folk, patupaiarehe were said to live in the mountains and forests, cleaving to darkness, and building their homes from swirling mists. They had pale skin and red or fair hair, and bewitched people, especially young women, luring them away. Redhead and albino Māori were sometimes said to be the result of interbreeding. Today, some speculate that patupaiarehe descended from early Europeans who arrived here before Polynesians.

10 September - 26 February  |  See event detail
Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

10 December - 28 May  |  See event detail
Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

10 December - 12 March  |  See event detail
Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

10 December - 02 July  |  See event detail
De la Milpa a la Mesa

De la Milpa a la Mesa takes visitors on a journey of discovery to a country of incredible cultural and ecological diversity, whose agriculture and cuisine are treasured World Heritage. From the farm to the market to the table, food has been the heart and soul of Mexican life for millennia.

18 February - 07 March  |  See event detail
Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
EXHIBITIONS ON Monday 27 February
Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

10 December - 28 May  |  See event detail
Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

10 December - 12 March  |  See event detail
Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

10 December - 02 July  |  See event detail
De la Milpa a la Mesa

De la Milpa a la Mesa takes visitors on a journey of discovery to a country of incredible cultural and ecological diversity, whose agriculture and cuisine are treasured World Heritage. From the farm to the market to the table, food has been the heart and soul of Mexican life for millennia.

18 February - 07 March  |  See event detail
Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
EXHIBITIONS ON Tuesday 28 February
Ayesha Green: Still life

These new works by Ayesha Green (Ngāti Kahungunu, Kāi Tahu) were produced during her recent residency at Parehuia-McCahon House. They mark a shift into still-life painting and the negotiation of the complex conventions of this historic genre. As with all of Green’s work, these new paintings are layered with references and are mindful of the formats and genres they utilise, prompting us to consider the history and politics of representation. Many are juxtaposed with painted tributes to important texts that present various frameworks for unpacking our national narratives.

10 December - 28 May  |  See event detail
Moniek Schrijer: Screensaver

In response to being artist-in-residence at Parehuia-McCahon House in 2021, jeweller Moniek Schrijer presents an exhibition influenced by the ecology of the McCahon House garden, local climate, lunar events, and the distinctive light at this famously forested historic residency. These works document shifts in atmospheric conditions, contrasting perspectives and details from the landscape, streetscape and built environment with zoomed-in close-ups of liquids, changing shadows and observations of the play of light as time passes.

10 December - 12 March  |  See event detail
Fiona Jack & Courtney Sina Meredith: Earth Posters

Earth posters is the first presentation of a collaboration between writer Courtney Sina Meredith and artist Fiona Jack. The result is a merging of text and clay that captures an exchange between friends, and a moment in time. 

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
Cellular memories and planetary designs: Three works by Elizabeth Thomson

Titirangi-born Elizabeth Thomson (born 1955) has devoted much of her career as a sculptor/visual artist to exploring both the order and randomness she finds not only in the physical world but in the fabric of human life and thought. As a special encore for the recent exhibition, Cellular memory, three works are exhibited in Te Uru’s distinctive spiral staircase and highlight three very different approaches to art-making, each of them bringing together elements from the methodology of sculpture, painting, photography and applied arts. Thomson’s works take the forms, colours and textures of the world around us and translate them into a visual language which is, at once, mysterious yet strangely familiar.

10 December - 02 July  |  See event detail
De la Milpa a la Mesa

De la Milpa a la Mesa takes visitors on a journey of discovery to a country of incredible cultural and ecological diversity, whose agriculture and cuisine are treasured World Heritage. From the farm to the market to the table, food has been the heart and soul of Mexican life for millennia.

18 February - 07 March  |  See event detail
Portage 22

Te Uru is delighted to present the Portage Ceramic Awards 2022. This annual award provides a vital platform to showcase the diversity of contemporary clay practices in Aotearoa. The awards are open to all New Zealand artists both established and emerging whose work spans sculptural and domestic clay traditions as well as other disciplines, including photography and videography.

26 November - 05 March  |  See event detail
EXHIBITIONS ON Wednesday 01 March
Start from: November 26, 2022 - 8:00 am
End at: March 5, 2023 - 6:00 pm

Portage 22

EXHIBITIONS ON Thursday 02 March
Start from: November 26, 2022 - 8:00 am
End at: March 5, 2023 - 6:00 pm

Portage 22

EXHIBITIONS ON Friday 03 March
Start from: November 26, 2022 - 8:00 am
End at: March 5, 2023 - 6:00 pm

Portage 22

EXHIBITIONS ON Saturday 04 March
Start from: November 26, 2022 - 8:00 am
End at: March 5, 2023 - 6:00 pm

Portage 22

EXHIBITIONS ON Sunday 05 March
Start from: November 26, 2022 - 8:00 am
End at: March 5, 2023 - 6:00 pm

Portage 22

Coming up soon

Please refer to the printed Exhibition Brochure available at the Gallery reception.